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 Are USB ASIC Miner Devices Profitable? - CoinCentral

Are USB ASIC Miner Devices Profitable? - CoinCentral

Bitcoin ASIC Mining - 300 MH/s USB Powered Device for 1.99 BTC

Bitcoin ASIC Mining - 300 MH/s USB Powered Device for 1.99 BTC submitted by Micro_lite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I earned about 4000% more btc with my android tablet than with a $250 ASIC mini rig setup using GekkoScience Newpac USB miners!

Requirements:
1.) Android Device with access to Google Play Store. *I haven't tried yet but you may be able to use tis on Android TV devces as well by sideloading. If anyone has success before I try, let me know! -Note, I did this with a Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 so its a newer more powerful device. If your android is older, your profts will most likely be less than what I earned but to give a projected range I also tested on my Raspberry Pi 4 running a custom LineageOS rom that doesn't allow the OS to make full use of the Pi's specs and I still got 500 h/s on that with Cloud boost, so about 60% of what my Tab 6 with MUCH Higher Specs does.
**Hey guys. Before I get started i just wanted to be clear about one thing. Yes I have seen those scammy posts sharing "miracle" boosts and fixes. I have a hard time believing stuff online anymore. But this is honestly real. Ill attach photos and explain the whole story and process below. Thanks for taking the time to read and feel free to share any thoughts, concerns, tips, etc*
So last week I finally got started with my first mini rig type mining build. I started getting into crypto about a year ago and it has taken me a long time to even grasp half of the projects out there but its been fun thus far! Anyways my rig was 2 GekkoScience Newpac USB miners, a Moonlander USB miner to pair with an FPGA i already had mining, a 10 port 60W 3.0 USB hub and 2 usb fans. The Newpacs actually are hashing at a combined 280 g/s which is actually better than their reported max hash rate when overclocked. Pleasant surpise and they are simple!! I just wanted to get a moonlander because my fpga already mines on Odocrypt for DGB and I just wanted to experience Scrypt mining and help build the DGB project. The Newpacs are mining BTC though.
After I got everything up and running i checked my payout daily average after 1 week. I averaged .01 a day TOTAL between all three miners with them all perforing ABOVE SPEC!!! I had done research so i knew I wouldnt earn much. More than anything i just wanted to learn. But still. I was kinda surprised in a negative way. Yesterday I actually earned less than .01 Frustrated I went back to scouring the web for new ideas. About a year ago, when II was starting, I saw an app on my iphone called CryptoBrowser that claimed to mine btc on your phone without actually using phone resources using a method of cloud mining. I tried it for a week and quit because I earned like .03 after a ton of use and seemed scammy. Plus my iphone actually would get very hot when doing this so I quit using it as it seemed like a possible scam with all the cryptonight browser mining hacks and malware out there.
Anyways I was on my Galaxy Tab S6 and saw that CryptoBrowser released a "PRO" edition for 3.99 on Google Play. I bought it for Sh*ts and giggles and booted it up. It came with what they called "Cloud Boost" Essentially this is a button you press and it multiplys the estimated hashrate that it gives you device by the number shown on the boost button. (With the purchase of PRO you get one free x10 boost. You can purchase additional boosts to use with other android devices but those are actually pretty pricy. Another x10 boost was like $25 if i remember correctly).
I played with it for about an hour to see if it actually worked like it said it would this time. To my surprise, as i was browsing, my device didnt increase in temperature AT ALL!!!!! I checked my tast manager to confirm and it was indeed true, my memory and usage barely went up. it was giving me an estimated range of 80-105 on the hashrate. Once i pushed the x10 boost button, that went to 800-1150 h/s. I switched my screen to not go to sleep, plugged it to the charge and let it run on the browser page, hashing. When you push the boost button, it runs for 3 hours at the boosted speeds. After that it goes back to normal but if you press the button again, it boosts everything again. There is no limit to how many times you use it. After checking what I earned after 24 hours, I HAD MADE .40 in BTC!!!!! I JUST EARNED OVER 4000% MORE THAN MY $280 MINING RIG EARNED ME!!!! I was blown away. Maybe this was a fluke? I did it again next day. Every 3 hours or so I would push the button again but thats all. Sure enough, .35 that day. Also, it realy BTC. I requested a payout and although it took like 12 hours for them to send me an email stating they had just sent it, I actually did recieve the state amount of BTC within 24 hours in my personal wallet. The fees to send are SUPER LOW!. Like .01
Below I will list the steps I took, along with an explanation of thier "Mining" process on Androids. Reminder, this ONLY WORKS ON ANDROIDS. Also DO NOT use cryptobrowser on a physcal laptop or desktop. I ran it on an old laptop for three days last year and it fried it. It does actually use your hardware on those platforms to mine and it is not efficnet at all as I suspect they prob steal over half of your power for themselves using the REAL RandomX protocol via browser mining which is EXTREMELY INEFFICIENT DONT TRY IT!!
-----How To Do This Yourself:
Cryptotab Browser states the program works on Android devices by estimating what it thinks the hashrate would be for your device specs and siimulates what you would mine in a remote server however you still earn that estimated coin amount. It is not a SHA-256 process or coin that they say is mining, rather it is XMR and they swap that and pay it out to you in BTC Bitcoin. However I know damn well my Tab S6 doesnt hash 80-105 h/s on RandomX because I have done it with a moodified XMRig module i ported to Android. I got 5 h/s a sec if I was getting any hashes at all. But thats besides the point as I still was making money.
Now, when you press that cloud boost button it immediately boosts that hash rate it estimates by the number on the cloud boost. As stated above, you can purchase more boosts and gift them or use them on extra android devices that you may have. Again, they are pricey so I'm not doing that plus it would just mean that I have another device that I have to leave on and open. The boosts come in x2, x4, x6, x8 and x10 variants. Again, they have unlimited uses.
Here is the link to grab yourself CryptoBrowser Pro from CryptoTab. This IS A REFERRAL LINK! This is where I benefit from doing tis tutorial. Like i said, I want to be transparent as this is not a scam but I'm also not doing this out of the love of my heart. Their referral system works in that people that use the donwload the app using your link are your stage 1 referrals. Anytime they are mining, you earn a 15% bonus. So say they mine $.30 one day. You would get paid out an additional $.045 in your own balance (it does not come out of the referred user balance fyi so no worries). Then lets say that referred miner also gets their own referrals. I would get a 10% bonus on whatever THOSE people mine. This goes on and on for like 8 tiers. Each tier the bonus percntage essential halves. So again, I stand to benefit from this but it also is stupid to not make this visible as its WAY CHEAPER, EASIER AND MORE PROFITABLE TO GET BTC USING THIS METHOD THAN IT IS USING ASICS!! THIS EARNS ALMOST AS MUCH BTC AS AN ANTMINER S7 DOES RUNNING 24/7 ONLY WITHOUT THE HUGE ELLECTRICTY BILL AND COSTS!!!!)
Thats it. Again, if you have concerns, let me know or if you have suggestions, other tips, etc... mention those as well!!!
https://cryptotabbrowser.com/8557319
Links to Picture Proof http://imgur.com/gallery/P13bEsB
submitted by Afraid_Balance to earnbitcoin [link] [comments]

ASICMINER is going to release this little cute chip! 300Mhash/s, powered by USB.

ASICMINER is going to release this little cute chip! 300Mhash/s, powered by USB. submitted by Fabrizio89 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
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Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
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Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
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Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
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Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
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Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
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Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
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Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
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Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
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Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
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**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

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CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

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MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
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RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
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THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
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POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
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STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
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Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
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Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

a total noob to mining. help me out.

i just started learning about cryptocurrency and mining. looks like lot of fun. i want to make mining a hobby. Please guide me to setup a wallet and install best mining software. links to any existing threads will be helpful
submitted by ravireads to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

ASICMiner Lowers USB Miner Price to 0.89 Bitcoins, Early Adoptors Lose Out

ASICMiner Lowers USB Miner Price to 0.89 Bitcoins, Early Adoptors Lose Out submitted by Micro_lite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Beaglebone Black as a Bitcoin Mining Controller

submitted by dsyncd to BeagleBone [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them.

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive constructive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

Can we talk about the centralization of mining again?

This is one aspect that, despite searching, I don't feel I've found an adequate answer to. As mining becomes more and more expensive, I can only see mining migrating to the hands of a few. Some could argue it's already done that.
Is this a problem that will need to be addressed?
submitted by Naviers_Stoked to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them. Feel free to use or send me an e-mail if you want the txt file

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Questions about starting using NiceHash Miner 2

Hi,
I am looking into mining cryptocurrency right now because i am interested. The recent gain of value in bitcoin hit my attention like probably everyone here :-)
I have heard of methods to mine especially with NiceHash Miner 2 (using computers, easy way) and an ASIC device such Antminer S7 (Look advanced to me). I already know there is a cost in electricity and such. However there are parts missing from my research and the whole puzzle..
My goal is not to make a tons of cash, i just want to explore the world of cryptocurrency and if possible get back my investment. I know there is an hardware investment but that not a problem for me especially since i might need a new computer anyway, however i might prefer to go the ASIC way if its better and that why i am here.
I have some questions...
1- Do the ASIC device such Antminer S7 do exactly the same thing that NiceHash Miner 2 ? Can Antminer S7 mine other cryptocurrencies than Bitcoin ?
2- There is a calculator on NiceHash Miner 2 website. How much this thing is accurate ? Do you really can make a profit based on this calculator numbers ?
3- I keep earing you get less profits if the difficulty raise. The difficulty will raise over time. What this really mean exactly ? In my understanding, NiceHash seem to mine from most profitable cryptocurrencies. Do that only affect Bitcoins or this can also affect other cyptocurrencies ? Do that effect is mitigated using NiceHash ?
4- Question about the wallet. How easy it is to convert the crypto currency into real cash ?
5- For storage do you recommand using a physical USB device instead ? Do cryptocurrencies take a lots of place or bandwidth ?
6- Knowing i need a new computer soon... should i invest in a new computer to mine using NiceHash Miner 2 in order to buy back my investment in a year ? or should i try invest in a S7 Antminer ? I could aswell just invest in bitcoin however i am not so sure that would be fun or the profit would be better in the long run. From your experience so far, which way should i try ?
Thanks a lots!
submitted by NoradZero to NiceHash [link] [comments]

My Experience: From FX-8350 to R7-1700

Upgrading from an FX-8350 to a R7-1700.
Just a bit about me – I have been building computers since the mid 80’s. I missed the 8-inch floppy disk era, but came on board when dual 5.25” was considered mainstream and a 10-megabyte full-height HDD was the mark of a power user. The first computer I built for my own enjoyment was an AMD X5-133 (a factory overclocked 486 faster than the Pentium-75), and I’ve used a wide variety of systems since then, including a Pentium Pro-200 which served me well in college and a K6-2 which I took to quite a few LAN parties. While I’ve always had Intel notebooks, my PC’s have been AMD for quite some time now. I decided to upgrade my current main machine, which is an FX-8350 with a mild 4.4Ghz overclock. I was using 2x8GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600 and a Sapphire Radeon Fury Nitro. While I know the R5-1600x would be a better bet for a pure gaming build, I have a soft spot for 8-core machines. I had been tempted to pull the trigger on an i7-7700k for a while, but the timing never worked out. But when I found the R7-1700 at a deep discount and an X370 motherboard on the shelf next to it – I couldn’t resist the siren call of a new build.
Here are my thoughts about the process:
AM4 is physically the same as AM3 from a build perspective, except for the mounting holes. I don’t know what was so important about making the holes have different offsets, but this makes it much more difficult to get quality cooling. Not all manufacturers have brackets yet, and I’m still waiting on Cooler Master to release the brackets for my Siedon 240.
The new motherboard feels very different from my AM3 board. My FX-8350 sat on an ASUS M5A99FX Pro R2.0. It was, for lack of a better word, a very workstation-ish board. 4 PCIx16 slots, 10x USB ports (2 of the USB 3.0), triple USB 2.0 front panel headers (and a USB 3.0 front panel header as well), eSATA on the rear panel, beefy VRM and Northbridge cooling, Toslink output for audio, and so on. The board itself is full of tiny components, support chips, and ports. Granted, many of these connectors are outdated (eSATA and USB2.0), and the PCIe is only 2.0 instead of current-gen 3.0, but there is a LOT of connectivity. Few people paired an FX chip with triple of quad-GPU for gaming, but I know a fair number of people used these for bitcoin mining back before there was widespread ASIC support and back then GPU mining was the most cost-effective way to mint cryptocurrency. Extra PCIe slots could be used for dedicated video capture, PCI-based storage, a RAID card, etc... Having 4 full-size slots allows this kind of flexibility. The new motherboard is an Asrock Fatal1ty x370 Gaming K4. It does not feel very workstation-ish at all. It has only two 16x PCIe slots (and when they are both in use they are only 8x), 8 USB ports on the rear panel, and a much less “busy” motherboard. Very few support chips litter its surface. Instead of a workstation component, it feels much more like a luxury consumer product. This is not a bad thing – just something I noticed while building the system. The rear IO shield is red and black to match its gaming aesthetic, it includes things like premium audio (including a very nice headphone amplifier for the front panel connectors), and while it only has 8x USB ports on the back, 6 of them are USB 3.0 and two of them (including a type-C connector) are USB 3.1 gen2. It includes RGB LED’s under the chipset heatsink and three separate RGB LED controller ports (one of which is used for the boxed cooler), Intel gigabit Ethernet, and dual M.2 slots (one of which connected directly to the CPU). It is very different in “feel” from the older ASUS board, even down to things like a shroud for the external connectors and metal-reinforced PCI slots. I must say, its more aggressive appearance and near-empty areas appeal to me. It does, however, funnel the builder into a particular configuration: limited fast storage through the M.2 slots, slow(er) storage through the 6x SATA ports, all external devices should be USB 3. Personally, these limitations didn’t restrict me for this build, since that was how I was going to set it up anyway, but the fewer connectivity choices might cause some pause for others. The only thing I don’t like about this board is the 20 second POST times. 20 seconds every time. Resuming from sleep is very fast, just reboots are slow. That’s really it. I have no substantive complaints other than that – well, and the memory speed limitations – more on that below.
The Wraith Spire cooler is without doubt the best looking box cooler I’ve ever seen. The symmetrical cylinder look, combined with the LED logo and RGB ring are very striking. I can see why many people have asked to order one, though I think for the 1700X and 1800X they are better off without it. I’ll explain why further down.
Initial hardware setup was very easy. I was able to flash to the newest 2.0 BIOS without any hassle using a DOS USB flash boot drive. The 2.0 BIOS has the newest AGESA code from AMD, as well as support for the R5 processors and better DDR4 compatibility. I didn’t want to cheap out on RAM since apparently Ryzen is sensitive to DDR4 speeds for the latency between cores. I bought the cheapest 16GB DDR4-3200 kit I could find (the EVGA SuperSC 2x8GB), for which I paid $115. While I was not able to get it to boot at 3200, I could get 2933 simply by activating XMP, then manually changing the speed from 3200 to 3000. I then tested it with MemTest86 for two complete cycles, which it passed without errors. I have encountered zero memory issues with these RAM sticks running at 2933. Since this motherboard does not officially support DDR4-3200 at all, I figure this is a good outcome. I am curious to know whether anyone has gotten 3200 on this board – that is, whether the lack of 3200 memory on Asrock’s QVL is a marketing issue or an actual hardware limitation – but I didn’t want to spend nearly double that amount in order to get AM4 verified memory (G.Skill’s FlareX), and 2966 seemed fast enough from the benchmark results I had read.
My old setup had a Samsung 850 EVO 256gb SATA6 drive as the primary boot/gaming drive. It seemed plenty fast but it had become too small for my needs, so this seemed like a good opportunity to buy a new SSD. I originally thought the NVMe drives would be out of my price range, but I bought the Intel 600p 512GB drive for only $10 more than I would have paid for a premium SATA6 drive. Though the 600p is without doubt the SLOWEST NVMe drive out there, it has 3x the read speed as the SATA6 drives, and most of what I am doing with it is trying to get quicker load times. If I was using it for professional workloads (as a video editing scratch drive, for example), I would need much higher sustained write speeds and then Samsung would be the obvious answer. I just didn’t want to spend an extra $80 on write performance that I’d never notice, and the 600p has been an excellent boot/gaming drive.
Ok, back to the Wraith Spire. I tend to have bad luck with the silicon lottery. My FX-8350 was not able to be stable above 4.4Ghz with reasonable temperatures. I was hoping I would be able to get better results from the R7-1700, since general reports indicated that it overclocked well. Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell how good of an overclock I am getting since I can find no good information about maximum recommended temperatures for this chip. Some people say 75c is the maximum safe temp. Others say 75c is a fine everyday 24/7 temp. Others say they are running it at 80c all the time without any issues at all. Steve at Techspot was getting 88c and 90c when overclocking the 1600X and 1500X using the stock coolers and without any instability – were those dangerous temps or totally fine? Nobody seems to know. I like my overclocks to be set-and-forget. I want to get it dialed in and then leave it for years without worrying that it will burn up or degrade or that in this or that application I have to turn back to stock speeds because of the thermals. Since I don’t know what max safe thermals are, I just have to guess based on stock thermals.
For stock speeds, the Wraith Spire does a good job. It is very quiet, and after a few BIOS fan-curve tweaks, it keeps the chip around 35-38 at idle, and around 68-70 on Prime95 (Small FFT, for maximum temperature generation). Incidentally, it also hits 70 if I run Cinebench a bunch of times in a row as well, so I don’t consider the Small FFT test to be totally unrealistic for the load this chip might encounter. From what I can tell, these are good normal temps. I can get 3.5Ghz by simply changing the multiplier and leaving the voltage at stock. This gives Cinebench numbers around the 1550 mark (roughly 6900k levels). Prime95 shows a modest boost in temperatures of 3-4 degrees C, and was stable even for several hours. If I push it to 3.6Ghz at stock voltage the system is unstable. At 3.7Ghz (the 1700’s boost speed for single-threaded loads) it is stable only if I give it 1.3v. While that is a totally fine voltage (AMD recommends up to 1.35v for 24/7), the Wraith Spire cannot handle a Prime95 Small FFT load anymore. I shut down the test and reverted the OC when the CPU read 89c. Given the fact that the Spire was meant to cool a 65w chip (and so probably is rated at no more than 85-95w), this is not a terribly surprising temperature – I wish I knew if it was dangerous. I have no doubt that a 240mm radiator or even a decent tower cooler will be more than enough to cool down my 3.7Ghz R7-1700. I am a little jealous of the people who just set the multiplier to 3700 and are good to go – lower voltages probably mean the Spire would be enough. But for me, it was not to be. I was halfway tempted to see at what temperature the chip would reduce its clock speed, but I didn’t want to burn up a chip I had just bought – might as well wait until I get bigger and better cooling to OC it to the 3.8-3.9 I hope it will reach.
Other than the OC temps it has been smooth sailing. Gaming feels more fluid than with the FX, even in games that I always thought were GPU-limited and/or running at 60fps with VSYNC on. Especially games that are sensitive to single-core performance (Heroes of the Storm is my latest addiction) there is a definite boost in 1% low and 0.1% low FPS. I have been using the Ryzen Balanced power plan from AMD and it seems to do a fantastic job keeping temps low when idle and letting the cores ramp up really fast when needed. I need to test whether the lack of core parking prevents it from hitting the 3.7Ghz boost as much as the regular Balanced plan allows. I think a simple CineBench single-thread comparison will do the trick.
I also tried streaming a bit – and it was able to generate 1080p60fps at x264-medium settings without being noticeable while in game. Later I edited some video of my kids – the final render speed was SOOOO fast. I am, on the whole, very happy with my upgrade. I get better single-core performance, much much better multi-core performance, along with faster disk speeds, and a more modern platform (with RGB lighting, M.2, USB 3.1, etc…).
Now if only I could find out appropriate temperatures…..
submitted by Morphon to Amd [link] [comments]

Mini-Mining ASIC-Rig?

I would find it pretty cool to have a mini mining rig based on ASICS with Ethernet connection, something like a Raspberry with ASIC. But jus for a maximum o 100$, I know, its way to low. But I would like to have something like this just for fun!
submitted by Unomagan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Full Node Hardware Configuration Requirements - Multi-GPU and Legendary USB Mining

Make mining great again! Unlike traditional Bitcoin and Ethereum nodes, Cortex has a higher hardware requirement for full node. This requires a relatively larger amount of hard disk storage and a multi-GPU desktop host for the best possible speed of confirmation, but this is not a must. In the field of Bitcoin mining, the USB miner used to be a popular plug and play small ASIC mining device. Before the large-scale mining farms emerged, this decentralized mining mode was extremely popular. Cortex full node in the absence of GPU can be configured to have the similar neurocomputers with special AI chips, and computing stick, which have matured in the market. Unlike Bitcoin USB Mining, the computing stick is the complementary hardware to verify the full node, not the equipment needed in the specific process of mining.
submitted by cengiz0589 to Cortex_Official [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

My first 30 days running a Bitcoin only E-commerce business.

The MineNinja store, www.mineninja.com, has been up for a month now, so I figure its a good time to reflect on the whole experience of running a business that accepts Bitcoin exclusively. I’ve run other E-commerce websites, mainly selling digital products for PayPal. In my previous experiment I tried adding Bitcoin payment to one of my best performing products and honestly got less than stellar results even offering a huge discount.
After studying the market I determined that a better path was to offer a product that would appeal to one of the core segments of the Bitcoin participant population: Bitcoin miners. The MineNinja is a Bitcoin mining controller for managing USB connected ASIC devices.
I underestimated how difficult the whole process would be from manufacturing to shipping. The first few orders were very painful to fulfill. There were many late nights spent trying to dial in the packaging and shipping. 3d took some time to get dialed in correctly, and we threw away a ton of failed prints. It was a great learning experience.
I also learned that keeping everything denominated in Bitcoin is risky. When the price of Bitcoin fell, and I didn’t update my pricing quick enough, we had sales that resulted in a net loss. I could eliminate this risk by pricing in USD, but it’s a matter of principle to keep it all Bitcoin.
I didn’t do any sort of advertising, no Adwords or anything like that. All I have done is just a few posts on bitcoin and Bitcoin related forums. I did a total of 28BTC worth of sales for the first month.
Expenses:
Startup Investment - 3D printer: $2195
Cost of Goods Sold:
The USD denominated supplies were personally funded. I am trying to keep all the BTC earnings in BTC. I am moving my supply chain to Bitcoin as practical. I found a cool 3d Printer company www.makergeeks.com that accepts Bitcoin payments so next month’s personal finances will be a little better. I’m still having to pay USD to buy the boards as I have not yet found a supplier that accepts Bitcoin payment.
I don’t think my decision to go with a completely open source solution hurt sales too badly. Most customers chose the more expensive ready-to-mine options over the build-your-own. I got hit hard for BeagleBones when the BTC price dropped, and I didn’t adjust prices, but thankfully my low inventories and a recent rebound in price insulated me from disaster.
Now that I have shut down my GPUs, I can move the business from the dining room table to the room we now refer to as the "crap room." The big weekend project is to clean it out and convert it into the CoinNinja headquarters.
I’ve got quite a few cool things planned for the MineNinja project and other CoinNinja Open Source projects. Stay tuned.
submitted by Coinninja to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Antminer S9 no longer hashing?

Good morning folks,
I have an Antminer S9 that has performed flawlessly. After I moved it to a better location, I noticed that it no longer seems to be working. The green light is flashing, but it doesn't seem to be hashing to my pool (Nicehash).
I'm fairly new to Bitcoining mining and can't make sense of some of the information on my status screen. Before I jump into Bitmain support, I was wondering if anyone could clue me in as to what the problem might be.
https://s15.postimg.cc/i0n5qsyoInked_Capture_LI.jpg
I'll post my Kernal Log here.
Thank you in advance!!!
KERNAL LOG: [ 0.000000] Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0
[ 0.000000] Linux version 3.14.0-xilinx-ge8a2f71-dirty (lzq@armdev2) (gcc version 4.8.3 20140320 (prerelease) (Sourcery CodeBench Lite 2014.05-23) ) #82 SMP PREEMPT Tue May 16 19:49:53 CST 2017
[ 0.000000] CPU: ARMv7 Processor [413fc090] revision 0 (ARMv7), cr=18c5387d
[ 0.000000] CPU: PIPT / VIPT nonaliasing data cache, VIPT aliasing instruction cache
[ 0.000000] Machine model: Xilinx Zynq
[ 0.000000] cma: CMA: reserved 128 MiB at 27800000
[ 0.000000] Memory policy: Data cache writealloc
[ 0.000000] On node 0 totalpages: 258048
[ 0.000000] free_area_init_node: node 0, pgdat c0740a40, node_mem_map e6fd8000
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 1520 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 0 pages reserved
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 194560 pages, LIFO batch:31
[ 0.000000] HighMem zone: 496 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] HighMem zone: 63488 pages, LIFO batch:15
[ 0.000000] PERCPU: Embedded 8 pages/cpu @e6fc0000 s9088 r8192 d15488 u32768
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: s9088 r8192 d15488 u32768 alloc=8*4096
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: [0] 0 [0] 1
[ 0.000000] Built 1 zonelists in Zone order, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 256528
[ 0.000000] Kernel command line: noinitrd mem=1008M console=ttyPS0,115200 root=ubi0:rootfs ubi.mtd=1 rootfstype=ubifs rw rootwait
[ 0.000000] PID hash table entries: 4096 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Dentry cache hash table entries: 131072 (order: 7, 524288 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Inode-cache hash table entries: 65536 (order: 6, 262144 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Memory: 884148K/1032192K available (5032K kernel code, 283K rwdata, 1916K rodata, 204K init, 258K bss, 148044K reserved, 253952K highmem)
[ 0.000000] Virtual kernel memory layout:
[ 0.000000] vector : 0xffff0000 - 0xffff1000 ( 4 kB)
[ 0.000000] fixmap : 0xfff00000 - 0xfffe0000 ( 896 kB)
[ 0.000000] vmalloc : 0xf0000000 - 0xff000000 ( 240 MB)
[ 0.000000] lowmem : 0xc0000000 - 0xef800000 ( 760 MB)
[ 0.000000] pkmap : 0xbfe00000 - 0xc0000000 ( 2 MB)
[ 0.000000] modules : 0xbf000000 - 0xbfe00000 ( 14 MB)
[ 0.000000] .text : 0xc0008000 - 0xc06d1374 (6949 kB)
[ 0.000000] .init : 0xc06d2000 - 0xc0705380 ( 205 kB)
[ 0.000000] .data : 0xc0706000 - 0xc074cf78 ( 284 kB)
[ 0.000000] .bss : 0xc074cf84 - 0xc078d9fc ( 259 kB)
[ 0.000000] Preemptible hierarchical RCU implementation.
[ 0.000000] Dump stacks of tasks blocking RCU-preempt GP.
[ 0.000000] RCU restricting CPUs from NR_CPUS=4 to nr_cpu_ids=2.
[ 0.000000] RCU: Adjusting geometry for rcu_fanout_leaf=16, nr_cpu_ids=2
[ 0.000000] NR_IRQS:16 nr_irqs:16 16
[ 0.000000] ps7-slcr mapped to f0004000
[ 0.000000] zynq_clock_init: clkc starts at f0004100
[ 0.000000] Zynq clock init
[ 0.000015] sched_clock: 64 bits at 333MHz, resolution 3ns, wraps every 3298534883328ns
[ 0.000308] ps7-ttc #0 at f0006000, irq=43
[ 0.000618] Console: colour dummy device 80x30
[ 0.000658] Calibrating delay loop... 1325.46 BogoMIPS (lpj=6627328)
[ 0.040207] pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301
[ 0.040436] Mount-cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
[ 0.040459] Mountpoint-cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
[ 0.042612] CPU: Testing write buffer coherency: ok
[ 0.042974] CPU0: thread -1, cpu 0, socket 0, mpidr 80000000
[ 0.043036] Setting up static identity map for 0x4c4b00 - 0x4c4b58
[ 0.043263] L310 cache controller enabled
[ 0.043282] l2x0: 8 ways, CACHE_ID 0x410000c8, AUX_CTRL 0x72760000, Cache size: 512 kB
[ 0.121037] CPU1: Booted secondary processor
[ 0.210227] CPU1: thread -1, cpu 1, socket 0, mpidr 80000001
[ 0.210357] Brought up 2 CPUs
[ 0.210376] SMP: Total of 2 processors activated.
[ 0.210385] CPU: All CPU(s) started in SVC mode.
[ 0.211051] devtmpfs: initialized
[ 0.213481] VFP support v0.3: implementor 41 architecture 3 part 30 variant 9 rev 4
[ 0.214724] regulator-dummy: no parameters
[ 0.223736] NET: Registered protocol family 16
[ 0.226067] DMA: preallocated 256 KiB pool for atomic coherent allocations
[ 0.228361] cpuidle: using governor ladder
[ 0.228374] cpuidle: using governor menu
[ 0.235908] syscon f8000000.ps7-slcr: regmap [mem 0xf8000000-0xf8000fff] registered
[ 0.237440] hw-breakpoint: found 5 (+1 reserved) breakpoint and 1 watchpoint registers.
[ 0.237453] hw-breakpoint: maximum watchpoint size is 4 bytes.
[ 0.237572] zynq-ocm f800c000.ps7-ocmc: ZYNQ OCM pool: 256 KiB @ 0xf0080000
[ 0.259435] bio: create slab at 0
[ 0.261172] vgaarb: loaded
[ 0.261915] SCSI subsystem initialized
[ 0.262814] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs
[ 0.262985] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub
[ 0.263217] usbcore: registered new device driver usb
[ 0.263743] media: Linux media interface: v0.10
[ 0.263902] Linux video capture interface: v2.00
[ 0.264150] pps_core: LinuxPPS API ver. 1 registered
[ 0.264162] pps_core: Software ver. 5.3.6 - Copyright 2005-2007 Rodolfo Giometti <[giometti@linux.it](mailto:giometti@linux.it)>
[ 0.264286] PTP clock support registered
[ 0.264656] EDAC MC: Ver: 3.0.0
[ 0.265719] Advanced Linux Sound Architecture Driver Initialized.
[ 0.268708] DMA-API: preallocated 4096 debug entries
[ 0.268724] DMA-API: debugging enabled by kernel config
[ 0.268820] Switched to clocksource arm_global_timer
[ 0.289596] NET: Registered protocol family 2
[ 0.290280] TCP established hash table entries: 8192 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
[ 0.290375] TCP bind hash table entries: 8192 (order: 4, 65536 bytes)
[ 0.290535] TCP: Hash tables configured (established 8192 bind 8192)
[ 0.290612] TCP: reno registered
[ 0.290633] UDP hash table entries: 512 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.290689] UDP-Lite hash table entries: 512 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.290971] NET: Registered protocol family 1
[ 0.291346] RPC: Registered named UNIX socket transport module.
[ 0.291359] RPC: Registered udp transport module.
[ 0.291368] RPC: Registered tcp transport module.
[ 0.291376] RPC: Registered tcp NFSv4.1 backchannel transport module.
[ 0.291391] PCI: CLS 0 bytes, default 64
[ 0.291857] hw perfevents: enabled with ARMv7 Cortex-A9 PMU driver, 7 counters available
[ 0.293945] futex hash table entries: 512 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
[ 0.295408] bounce pool size: 64 pages
[ 0.296323] jffs2: version 2.2. (NAND) © 2001-2006 Red Hat, Inc.
[ 0.296525] msgmni has been set to 1486
[ 0.297330] io scheduler noop registered
[ 0.297343] io scheduler deadline registered
[ 0.297385] io scheduler cfq registered (default)
[ 0.308358] dma-pl330 f8003000.ps7-dma: Loaded driver for PL330 DMAC-2364208
[ 0.308380] dma-pl330 f8003000.ps7-dma: DBUFF-128x8bytes Num_Chans-8 Num_Peri-4 Num_Events-16
[ 0.434378] e0001000.serial: ttyPS0 at MMIO 0xe0001000 (irq = 82, base_baud = 3124999) is a xuartps
[ 1.006815] console [ttyPS0] enabled
[ 1.011106] xdevcfg f8007000.ps7-dev-cfg: ioremap 0xf8007000 to f0068000
[ 1.018731] [drm] Initialized drm 1.1.0 20060810
[ 1.036029] brd: module loaded
[ 1.045494] loop: module loaded
[ 1.055163] e1000e: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Driver - 2.3.2-k
[ 1.060985] e1000e: Copyright(c) 1999 - 2013 Intel Corporation.
[ 1.068779] libphy: XEMACPS mii bus: probed
[ 1.073341] ------------- phy_id = 0x3625e62
[ 1.078112] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: pdev->id -1, baseaddr 0xe000b000, irq 54
[ 1.087072] ehci_hcd: USB 2.0 'Enhanced' Host Controller (EHCI) Driver
[ 1.093912] ehci-pci: EHCI PCI platform driver
[ 1.101155] zynq-dr e0002000.ps7-usb: Unable to init USB phy, missing?
[ 1.107952] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[ 1.114850] mousedev: PS/2 mouse device common for all mice
[ 1.120975] i2c /dev entries driver
[ 1.127946] zynq-edac f8006000.ps7-ddrc: ecc not enabled
[ 1.133474] cpufreq_cpu0: failed to get cpu0 regulator: -19
[ 1.139426] Xilinx Zynq CpuIdle Driver started
[ 1.144261] sdhci: Secure Digital Host Controller Interface driver
[ 1.150384] sdhci: Copyright(c) Pierre Ossman
[ 1.154700] sdhci-pltfm: SDHCI platform and OF driver helper
[ 1.161601] mmc0: no vqmmc regulator found
[ 1.165614] mmc0: no vmmc regulator found
[ 1.208845] mmc0: SDHCI controller on e0100000.ps7-sdio [e0100000.ps7-sdio] using ADMA
[ 1.217539] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbhid
[ 1.223054] usbhid: USB HID core driver
[ 1.227806] nand: device found, Manufacturer ID: 0x2c, Chip ID: 0xda
[ 1.234107] nand: Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP
[ 1.238074] nand: 256MiB, SLC, page size: 2048, OOB size: 64
[ 1.244027] Bad block table found at page 131008, version 0x01
[ 1.250251] Bad block table found at page 130944, version 0x01
[ 1.256303] 3 ofpart partitions found on MTD device pl353-nand
[ 1.262080] Creating 3 MTD partitions on "pl353-nand":
[ 1.267174] 0x000000000000-0x000002000000 : "BOOT.bin-env-dts-kernel"
[ 1.275230] 0x000002000000-0x00000b000000 : "angstram-rootfs"
[ 1.282582] 0x00000b000000-0x000010000000 : "upgrade-rootfs"
[ 1.291630] TCP: cubic registered
[ 1.294869] NET: Registered protocol family 17
[ 1.299597] Registering SWP/SWPB emulation handler
[ 1.305497] regulator-dummy: disabling
[ 1.309875] UBI: attaching mtd1 to ubi0
[ 1.836565] UBI: scanning is finished
[ 1.848221] UBI: attached mtd1 (name "angstram-rootfs", size 144 MiB) to ubi0
[ 1.855302] UBI: PEB size: 131072 bytes (128 KiB), LEB size: 126976 bytes
[ 1.862063] UBI: min./max. I/O unit sizes: 2048/2048, sub-page size 2048
[ 1.868728] UBI: VID header offset: 2048 (aligned 2048), data offset: 4096
[ 1.875605] UBI: good PEBs: 1152, bad PEBs: 0, corrupted PEBs: 0
[ 1.881586] UBI: user volume: 1, internal volumes: 1, max. volumes count: 128
[ 1.888693] UBI: max/mean erase counter: 4/1, WL threshold: 4096, image sequence number: 1134783803
[ 1.897736] UBI: available PEBs: 0, total reserved PEBs: 1152, PEBs reserved for bad PEB handling: 40
[ 1.906953] UBI: background thread "ubi_bgt0d" started, PID 1080
[ 1.906959] drivers/rtc/hctosys.c: unable to open rtc device (rtc0)
[ 1.911038] ALSA device list:
[ 1.911042] No soundcards found.
[ 1.927420] UBIFS: background thread "ubifs_bgt0_0" started, PID 1082
[ 1.956473] UBIFS: recovery needed
[ 2.016970] UBIFS: recovery completed
[ 2.020709] UBIFS: mounted UBI device 0, volume 0, name "rootfs"
[ 2.026635] UBIFS: LEB size: 126976 bytes (124 KiB), min./max. I/O unit sizes: 2048 bytes/2048 bytes
[ 2.035771] UBIFS: FS size: 128626688 bytes (122 MiB, 1013 LEBs), journal size 9023488 bytes (8 MiB, 72 LEBs)
[ 2.045653] UBIFS: reserved for root: 0 bytes (0 KiB)
[ 2.050693] UBIFS: media format: w4/r0 (latest is w4/r0), UUID B079DD56-06BB-4E31-8F5E-A6604F480DB2, small LPT model
[ 2.061987] VFS: Mounted root (ubifs filesystem) on device 0:11.
[ 2.069184] devtmpfs: mounted
[ 2.072297] Freeing unused kernel memory: 204K (c06d2000 - c0705000)
[ 2.920928] random: dd urandom read with 0 bits of entropy available
[ 3.318860]
[ 3.318860] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 3.928853]
[ 3.928853] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 7.929682] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: Set clk to 124999998 Hz
[ 7.935787] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: link up (1000/FULL)
[ 22.563181] In axi fpga driver!
[ 22.566260] request_mem_region OK!
[ 22.569676] AXI fpga dev virtual address is 0xf01fe000
[ 22.574751] *base_vir_addr = 0x8c510
[ 22.590723] In fpga mem driver!
[ 22.593791] request_mem_region OK!
[ 22.597361] fpga mem virtual address is 0xf3000000
[ 23.408156]
[ 23.408156] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 24.038071]
[ 24.038071] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 28.038487] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: Set clk to 124999998 Hz
[ 28.044593] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: link up (1000/FULL)
This is XILINX board. Totalram: 1039794176
Detect 1GB control board of XILINX
DETECT HW version=0008c510
miner ID : 8118b4c610358854
Miner Type = S9
AsicType = 1387
real AsicNum = 63
use critical mode to search freq...
get PLUG ON=0x000000e0
Find hashboard on Chain[5]
Find hashboard on Chain[6]
Find hashboard on Chain[7]
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[5]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[5] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[5] has core num in PIC
Chain[5] ASIC[15] has core num=5
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[6]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[6] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[6] has core num in PIC
Chain[6] ASIC[17] has core num=8
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[7]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[7] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[7] has core num in PIC
Chain[7] ASIC[8] has core num=13
Chain[7] ASIC[9] has core num=11
Chain[7] ASIC[13] has core num=11
Chain[7] ASIC[19] has core num=14
Chain[7] ASIC[30] has core num=6
Chain[7] ASIC[32] has core num=1
Chain[7] ASIC[42] has core num=2
Chain[7] ASIC[55] has core num=1
Chain[7] ASIC[57] has core num=2
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
get PIC voltage=108 on chain[5], value=880
get PIC voltage=74 on chain[6], value=900
get PIC voltage=108 on chain[7], value=880
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
chain[5] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[5] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[5] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
chain[6] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[6] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[6] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
chain[7] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[7] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[7] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
CRC error counter=0
set command mode to VIL
--- check asic number
After Get ASIC NUM CRC error counter=0
set_baud=0
The min freq=700
set real timeout 52, need sleep=379392
After TEST CRC error counter=0
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
search freq for 1 times, completed chain = 3, total chain num = 3
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
restart Miner chance num=2
waiting for receive_func to exit!
waiting for pic heart to exit!
bmminer not found= 1643 root 0:00 grep bmminer
bmminer not found, restart bmminer ...
This is user mode for mining
Detect 1GB control board of XILINX
Miner Type = S9
Miner compile time: Fri Nov 17 17:57:49 CST 2017 type: Antminer S9set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
miner ID : 8118b4c610358854
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
Checking fans!get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
chain[5]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J6] has backup chain_voltage=880
Chain[J6] test patten OK temp=-126
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[6]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J7] has backup chain_voltage=900
Chain[J7] test patten OK temp=-120
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[7]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J8] has backup chain_voltage=880
Chain[J8] test patten OK temp=-125
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
Chain[J6] orignal chain_voltage_pic=108 value=880
Chain[J7] orignal chain_voltage_pic=74 value=900
Chain[J8] orignal chain_voltage_pic=108 value=880
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
Chain[J6] has 63 asic
Chain[J7] has 63 asic
Chain[J8] has 63 asic
Chain[J6] has core num in PIC
Chain[J6] ASIC[15] has core num=5
Chain[J7] has core num in PIC
Chain[J7] ASIC[17] has core num=8
Chain[J8] has core num in PIC
Chain[J8] ASIC[8] has core num=13
Chain[J8] ASIC[9] has core num=11
Chain[J8] ASIC[13] has core num=11
Chain[J8] ASIC[19] has core num=14
Chain[J8] ASIC[30] has core num=6
Chain[J8] ASIC[32] has core num=1
Chain[J8] ASIC[42] has core num=2
Chain[J8] ASIC[55] has core num=1
Chain[J8] ASIC[57] has core num=2
miner total rate=13999GH/s fixed rate=13500GH/s
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[5]
Chain:5 chipnum=63
Chain[J6] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:5 temp offset=0
Chain:5 base freq=487
Asic[ 0]:618
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:681 Asic[ 3]:618 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:681 Asic[ 6]:618 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:675
Asic[ 9]:618 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:681 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:606 Asic[15]:487 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:675 Asic[18]:618 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:675 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:687 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:537 Asic[26]:687 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:587 Asic[29]:687 Asic[30]:612 Asic[31]:650 Asic[32]:687
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:650 Asic[35]:687 Asic[36]:631 Asic[37]:662 Asic[38]:693 Asic[39]:631 Asic[40]:662
Asic[41]:662 Asic[42]:543 Asic[43]:668 Asic[44]:693 Asic[45]:568 Asic[46]:675 Asic[47]:700 Asic[48]:631
Asic[49]:568 Asic[50]:700 Asic[51]:631 Asic[52]:625 Asic[53]:700 Asic[54]:631 Asic[55]:675 Asic[56]:662
Asic[57]:631 Asic[58]:662 Asic[59]:687 Asic[60]:631 Asic[61]:681 Asic[62]:700
Chain:5 max freq=700
Chain:5 min freq=487
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[6]
Chain:6 chipnum=63
Chain[J7] voltage added=0.1V
Chain:6 temp offset=0
Chain:6 base freq=687
Asic[ 0]:650
Asic[ 1]:650 Asic[ 2]:650 Asic[ 3]:650 Asic[ 4]:650 Asic[ 5]:650 Asic[ 6]:650 Asic[ 7]:650 Asic[ 8]:650
Asic[ 9]:650 Asic[10]:650 Asic[11]:650 Asic[12]:650 Asic[13]:650 Asic[14]:650 Asic[15]:650 Asic[16]:650
Asic[17]:650 Asic[18]:650 Asic[19]:650 Asic[20]:650 Asic[21]:650 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:650 Asic[24]:650
Asic[25]:650 Asic[26]:656 Asic[27]:656 Asic[28]:656 Asic[29]:656 Asic[30]:656 Asic[31]:656 Asic[32]:656
Asic[33]:656 Asic[34]:656 Asic[35]:656 Asic[36]:656 Asic[37]:656 Asic[38]:656 Asic[39]:656 Asic[40]:656
Asic[41]:656 Asic[42]:656 Asic[43]:656 Asic[44]:656 Asic[45]:656 Asic[46]:656 Asic[47]:656 Asic[48]:656
Asic[49]:656 Asic[50]:656 Asic[51]:656 Asic[52]:656 Asic[53]:656 Asic[54]:656 Asic[55]:656 Asic[56]:656
Asic[57]:656 Asic[58]:656 Asic[59]:656 Asic[60]:656 Asic[61]:656 Asic[62]:656
Chain:6 max freq=656
Chain:6 min freq=650
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[7]
Chain:7 chipnum=63
Chain[J8] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:7 temp offset=0
Chain:7 base freq=637
Asic[ 0]:656
Asic[ 1]:656 Asic[ 2]:656 Asic[ 3]:656 Asic[ 4]:656 Asic[ 5]:656 Asic[ 6]:656 Asic[ 7]:656 Asic[ 8]:637
Asic[ 9]:637 Asic[10]:656 Asic[11]:656 Asic[12]:656 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:656 Asic[15]:662 Asic[16]:662
Asic[17]:662 Asic[18]:662 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:662 Asic[21]:662 Asic[22]:662 Asic[23]:662 Asic[24]:662
Asic[25]:662 Asic[26]:662 Asic[27]:662 Asic[28]:662 Asic[29]:662 Asic[30]:637 Asic[31]:662 Asic[32]:662
Asic[33]:662 Asic[34]:662 Asic[35]:662 Asic[36]:662 Asic[37]:662 Asic[38]:662 Asic[39]:662 Asic[40]:662
Asic[41]:662 Asic[42]:650 Asic[43]:662 Asic[44]:662 Asic[45]:662 Asic[46]:662 Asic[47]:662 Asic[48]:662
Asic[49]:662 Asic[50]:662 Asic[51]:662 Asic[52]:662 Asic[53]:662 Asic[54]:662 Asic[55]:650 Asic[56]:662
Asic[57]:650 Asic[58]:662 Asic[59]:662 Asic[60]:662 Asic[61]:662 Asic[62]:662
Chain:7 max freq=662
Chain:7 min freq=637
Miner fix freq ...
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[5]
Chain:5 chipnum=63
Chain[J6] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:5 temp offset=0
Chain:5 base freq=487
Asic[ 0]:618
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:650 Asic[ 3]:618 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:656 Asic[ 6]:618 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:656
Asic[ 9]:618 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:656 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:606 Asic[15]:487 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:656 Asic[18]:618 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:656 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:656 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:537 Asic[26]:656 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:587 Asic[29]:656 Asic[30]:612 Asic[31]:650 Asic[32]:656
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:650 Asic[35]:656 Asic[36]:631 Asic[37]:656 Asic[38]:656 Asic[39]:631 Asic[40]:656
Asic[41]:656 Asic[42]:543 Asic[43]:656 Asic[44]:656 Asic[45]:568 Asic[46]:656 Asic[47]:656 Asic[48]:631
Asic[49]:568 Asic[50]:656 Asic[51]:631 Asic[52]:625 Asic[53]:656 Asic[54]:631 Asic[55]:656 Asic[56]:656
Asic[57]:631 Asic[58]:656 Asic[59]:656 Asic[60]:631 Asic[61]:656 Asic[62]:656
Chain:5 max freq=656
Chain:5 min freq=487
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[6]
Chain:6 chipnum=63
Chain[J7] voltage added=0.1V
Chain:6 temp offset=0
Chain:6 base freq=687
Asic[ 0]:631
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:631 Asic[ 3]:631 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:631 Asic[ 6]:631 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:631
Asic[ 9]:631 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:631 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:631 Asic[14]:631 Asic[15]:631 Asic[16]:631
Asic[17]:631 Asic[18]:631 Asic[19]:631 Asic[20]:631 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:631 Asic[23]:631 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:631 Asic[26]:631 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:631 Asic[29]:631 Asic[30]:631 Asic[31]:631 Asic[32]:631
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:631 Asic[35]:637 Asic[36]:637 Asic[37]:637 Asic[38]:637 Asic[39]:637 Asic[40]:637
Asic[41]:637 Asic[42]:637 Asic[43]:637 Asic[44]:637 Asic[45]:637 Asic[46]:637 Asic[47]:637 Asic[48]:637
Asic[49]:637 Asic[50]:637 Asic[51]:637 Asic[52]:637 Asic[53]:637 Asic[54]:637 Asic[55]:637 Asic[56]:637
Asic[57]:637 Asic[58]:637 Asic[59]:637 Asic[60]:637 Asic[61]:637 Asic[62]:637
Chain:6 max freq=637
Chain:6 min freq=631
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[7]
Chain:7 chipnum=63
Chain[J8] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:7 temp offset=0
Chain:7 base freq=637
Asic[ 0]:637
Asic[ 1]:637 Asic[ 2]:637 Asic[ 3]:637 Asic[ 4]:637 Asic[ 5]:637 Asic[ 6]:637 Asic[ 7]:637 Asic[ 8]:637
Asic[ 9]:637 Asic[10]:637 Asic[11]:637 Asic[12]:637 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:637 Asic[15]:637 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:637 Asic[18]:637 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:637 Asic[21]:637 Asic[22]:637 Asic[23]:637 Asic[24]:637
Asic[25]:637 Asic[26]:637 Asic[27]:637 Asic[28]:637 Asic[29]:637 Asic[30]:637 Asic[31]:637 Asic[32]:637
Asic[33]:637 Asic[34]:637 Asic[35]:637 Asic[36]:637 Asic[37]:637 Asic[38]:637 Asic[39]:637 Asic[40]:637
Asic[41]:637 Asic[42]:637 Asic[43]:637 Asic[44]:637 Asic[45]:637 Asic[46]:637 Asic[47]:637 Asic[48]:637
Asic[49]:643 Asic[50]:643 Asic[51]:643 Asic[52]:643 Asic[53]:643 Asic[54]:643 Asic[55]:643 Asic[56]:643
Asic[57]:643 Asic[58]:643 Asic[59]:643 Asic[60]:643 Asic[61]:643 Asic[62]:643
Chain:7 max freq=643
Chain:7 min freq=637
max freq = 656
set baud=1
Chain[J6] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[5] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[5] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J6] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[5] chip[244] local:26 remote:27 offset:29
Chain[J6] chip[244] get middle temp offset=29 typeID=55
Chain[J7] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[6] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[6] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J7] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[6] chip[244] local:26 remote:27 offset:29
Chain[J7] chip[244] get middle temp offset=29 typeID=55
Chain[J8] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[7] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[7] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J8] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[7] chip[244] local:26 remote:28 offset:28
Chain[J8] chip[244] get middle temp offset=28 typeID=55
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[5]
get PIC voltage=880 on chain[5], check: must be < 900
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[6]
get PIC voltage=900 on chain[6], check: must be < 900
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[7]
get PIC voltage=880 on chain[7], check: must be < 900
Chain[J6] set working voltage=880 [108]
Chain[J7] set working voltage=900 [74]
Chain[J8] set working voltage=880 [108]
do heat board 8xPatten for 1 times
start send works on chain[5]
start send works on chain[6]
start send works on chain[7]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[5]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[6]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[7]
wait recv nonce on chain[5]
wait recv nonce on chain[6]
wait recv nonce on chain[7]
get nonces on chain[5]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=912 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=912 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=912
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
freq[00]=618 freq[01]=631 freq[02]=650 freq[03]=618 freq[04]=631 freq[05]=656 freq[06]=618 freq[07]=631
freq[08]=656 freq[09]=618 freq[10]=631 freq[11]=656 freq[12]=631 freq[13]=637 freq[14]=606 freq[15]=487
freq[16]=637 freq[17]=656 freq[18]=618 freq[19]=637 freq[20]=656 freq[21]=631 freq[22]=650 freq[23]=656
freq[24]=631 freq[25]=537 freq[26]=656 freq[27]=631 freq[28]=587 freq[29]=656 freq[30]=612 freq[31]=650
freq[32]=656 freq[33]=631 freq[34]=650 freq[35]=656 freq[36]=631 freq[37]=656 freq[38]=656 freq[39]=631
freq[40]=656 freq[41]=656 freq[42]=543 freq[43]=656 freq[44]=656 freq[45]=568 freq[46]=656 freq[47]=656
freq[48]=631 freq[49]=568 freq[50]=656 freq[51]=631 freq[52]=625 freq[53]=656 freq[54]=631 freq[55]=656
freq[56]=656 freq[57]=631 freq[58]=656 freq[59]=656 freq[60]=631 freq[61]=656 freq[62]=656
total valid nonce number:57456
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:25912
last_nonce_num:14370
get nonces on chain[6]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=912 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=912 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=912
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
freq[00]=631 freq[01]=631 freq[02]=631 freq[03]=631 freq[04]=631 freq[05]=631 freq[06]=631 freq[07]=631
freq[08]=631 freq[09]=631 freq[10]=631 freq[11]=631 freq[12]=631 freq[13]=631 freq[14]=631 freq[15]=631
freq[16]=631 freq[17]=631 freq[18]=631 freq[19]=631 freq[20]=631 freq[21]=631 freq[22]=631 freq[23]=631
freq[24]=631 freq[25]=631 freq[26]=631 freq[27]=631 freq[28]=631 freq[29]=631 freq[30]=631 freq[31]=631
freq[32]=631 freq[33]=631 freq[34]=631 freq[35]=637 freq[36]=637 freq[37]=637 freq[38]=637 freq[39]=637
freq[40]=637 freq[41]=637 freq[42]=637 freq[43]=637 freq[44]=637 freq[45]=637 freq[46]=637 freq[47]=637
freq[48]=637 freq[49]=637 freq[50]=637 freq[51]=637 freq[52]=637 freq[53]=637 freq[54]=637 freq[55]=637
freq[56]=637 freq[57]=637 freq[58]=637 freq[59]=637 freq[60]=637 freq[61]=637 freq[62]=637
total valid nonce number:57456
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:25987
last_nonce_num:14368
get nonces on chain[7]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=907 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=909 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=911
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
asic[08]=907
core[049]=7 core[053]=5 core[056]=7
asic[19]=909
core[064]=7 core[112]=6
asic[55]=911
core[007]=7
freq[00]=637 freq[01]=637 freq[02]=637 freq[03]=637 freq[04]=637 freq[05]=637 freq[06]=637 freq[07]=637
freq[08]=637 freq[09]=637 freq[10]=637 freq[11]=637 freq[12]=637 freq[13]=637 freq[14]=637 freq[15]=637
freq[16]=637 freq[17]=637 freq[18]=637 freq[19]=637 freq[20]=637 freq[21]=637 freq[22]=637 freq[23]=637
freq[24]=637 freq[25]=637 freq[26]=637 freq[27]=637 freq[28]=637 freq[29]=637 freq[30]=637 freq[31]=637
freq[32]=637 freq[33]=637 freq[34]=637 freq[35]=637 freq[36]=637 freq[37]=637 freq[38]=637 freq[39]=637
freq[40]=637 freq[41]=637 freq[42]=637 freq[43]=637 freq[44]=637 freq[45]=637 freq[46]=637 freq[47]=637
freq[48]=637 freq[49]=643 freq[50]=643 freq[51]=643 freq[52]=643 freq[53]=643 freq[54]=643 freq[55]=643
freq[56]=643 freq[57]=643 freq[58]=643 freq[59]=643 freq[60]=643 freq[61]=643 freq[62]=643
total valid nonce number:57447
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:26183
last_nonce_num:35748
chain[5]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[5]: OK!
chain[6]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[6]: OK!
chain[7]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[7]: OK!
setStartTimePoint total_tv_start_sys=217 total_tv_end_sys=218
restartNum = 2 , auto-reinit enabled...
do read_temp_func once...
do check_asic_reg 0x08
get RT hashrate from Chain[5]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=72.5110 Asic[02]=68.6020 Asic[03]=74.4230 Asic[04]=74.6750 Asic[05]=71.4540 Asic[06]=77.5610 Asic[07]=74.7760 Asic[08]=74.3900
Asic[09]=77.7790 Asic[10]=76.7220 Asic[11]=73.8020 Asic[12]=68.5850 Asic[13]=76.1680 Asic[14]=72.4770 Asic[15]=73.0470 Asic[16]=57.8810
Asic[17]=74.4740 Asic[18]=76.4530 Asic[19]=67.8800 Asic[20]=70.1280 Asic[21]=73.7520 Asic[22]=74.6580 Asic[23]=73.6850 Asic[24]=78.5170
Asic[25]=73.6850 Asic[26]=63.6860 Asic[27]=80.9660 Asic[28]=73.9200 Asic[29]=68.9870 Asic[30]=75.6310 Asic[31]=74.9770 Asic[32]=69.4570
Asic[33]=74.6580 Asic[34]=79.8930 Asic[35]=76.6710 Asic[36]=74.3730 Asic[37]=66.6050 Asic[38]=76.7380 Asic[39]=71.4540 Asic[40]=69.3060
Asic[41]=72.5610 Asic[42]=73.8530 Asic[43]=58.9210 Asic[44]=75.3800 Asic[45]=73.1310 Asic[46]=68.4000 Asic[47]=77.6780 Asic[48]=73.1150
Asic[49]=69.2890 Asic[50]=62.8130 Asic[51]=74.2720 Asic[52]=73.1480 Asic[53]=67.4440 Asic[54]=72.4940 Asic[55]=68.1990 Asic[56]=72.4100
Asic[57]=75.3460 Asic[58]=66.1350 Asic[59]=72.9800 Asic[60]=78.1480 Asic[61]=72.3260 Asic[62]=72.5610 Asic[63]=77.7950
get RT hashrate from Chain[6]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=67.6620 Asic[02]=75.9840 Asic[03]=70.3300 Asic[04]=75.5640 Asic[05]=62.8470 Asic[06]=70.2790 Asic[07]=74.5240 Asic[08]=72.9130
Asic[09]=70.6320 Asic[10]=72.5610 Asic[11]=73.9370 Asic[12]=77.3420 Asic[13]=72.4440 Asic[14]=68.8030 Asic[15]=73.0810 Asic[16]=73.8360
Asic[17]=73.5510 Asic[18]=73.9700 Asic[19]=71.0340 Asic[20]=71.1680 Asic[21]=72.1580 Asic[22]=78.8190 Asic[23]=71.9230 Asic[24]=69.4570
Asic[25]=67.7630 Asic[26]=71.7220 Asic[27]=76.4030 Asic[28]=71.1180 Asic[29]=68.7360 Asic[30]=69.7090 Asic[31]=77.5610 Asic[32]=70.1790
Asic[33]=67.9140 Asic[34]=72.3930 Asic[35]=64.5920 Asic[36]=72.1920 Asic[37]=74.6080 Asic[38]=75.4470 Asic[39]=73.8700 Asic[40]=73.9370
Asic[41]=66.2860 Asic[42]=79.4230 Asic[43]=75.8160 Asic[44]=68.6350 Asic[45]=74.7920 Asic[46]=70.7990 Asic[47]=71.2360 Asic[48]=73.8700
Asic[49]=66.5380 Asic[50]=70.6150 Asic[51]=72.6280 Asic[52]=75.7490 Asic[53]=71.8400 Asic[54]=76.5370 Asic[55]=73.5340 Asic[56]=69.2390
Asic[57]=75.1280 Asic[58]=74.3230 Asic[59]=73.4330 Asic[60]=72.3430 Asic[61]=77.6780 Asic[62]=82.4600 Asic[63]=69.5240
get RT hashrate from Chain[7]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=73.5510 Asic[02]=75.9160 Asic[03]=80.1110 Asic[04]=76.9900 Asic[05]=76.1510 Asic[06]=73.5170 Asic[07]=74.9940 Asic[08]=73.1150
Asic[09]=70.6650 Asic[10]=70.6990 Asic[11]=72.4770 Asic[12]=70.1450 Asic[13]=74.3060 Asic[14]=71.8060 Asic[15]=74.7420 Asic[16]=75.6650
Asic[17]=76.8220 Asic[18]=69.5240 Asic[19]=72.0910 Asic[20]=75.2620 Asic[21]=72.0240 Asic[22]=73.2660 Asic[23]=76.2690 Asic[24]=69.9440
Asic[25]=67.7290 Asic[26]=71.7050 Asic[27]=74.6250 Asic[28]=78.2320 Asic[29]=69.8430 Asic[30]=68.4670 Asic[31]=71.5210 Asic[32]=68.9540
Asic[33]=74.6250 Asic[34]=71.8730 Asic[35]=74.4400 Asic[36]=74.8760 Asic[37]=73.9030 Asic[38]=72.9300 Asic[39]=69.6250 Asic[40]=74.9430
Asic[41]=72.7620 Asic[42]=69.4910 Asic[43]=67.4270 Asic[44]=71.4870 Asic[45]=74.4570 Asic[46]=66.6550 Asic[47]=67.5450 Asic[48]=75.4800
Asic[49]=72.2590 Asic[50]=72.9300 Asic[51]=75.6820 Asic[52]=71.9070 Asic[53]=67.9640 Asic[54]=67.8470 Asic[55]=74.3900 Asic[56]=71.0010
Asic[57]=75.8490 Asic[58]=74.9270 Asic[59]=72.3930 Asic[60]=74.3730 Asic[61]=75.5310 Asic[62]=73.8190 Asic[63]=72.4440
Check Chain[J6] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Check Chain[J7] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Check Chain[J8] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Done check_asic_reg
do read temp on Chain[5]
Chain[5] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=29
Chain[5] Chip[62] local Temp=60
Chain[5] Chip[62] middle Temp=70
Special fix Chain[5] Chip[62] middle Temp = 75
Done read temp on Chain[5]
do read temp on Chain[6]
Chain[6] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=29
Chain[6] Chip[62] local Temp=60
Chain[6] Chip[62] middle Temp=72
Special fix Chain[6] Chip[62] middle Temp = 75
Done read temp on Chain[6]
do read temp on Chain[7]
Chain[7] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=28
Chain[7] Chip[62] local Temp=62
Chain[7] Chip[62] middle Temp=72
Special fix Chain[7] Chip[62] middle Temp = 77
Done read temp on Chain[7]
set FAN speed according to: temp_highest=62 temp_top1[PWM_T]=62 temp_top1[TEMP_POS_LOCAL]=62 temp_change=0 fix_fan_steps=0
FAN PWM: 74
read_temp_func Done!
CRC error counter=0
submitted by Timsierramist to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

The $22,484.00 Butterfly Labs Mini Rig bitcoin miner is a huge, broken, unstable piece of shit.

(This was a rather controversial article posted on Buttcoin.org and became quite popular, even moving to the top of /bitcoin. It's since been mysteriously edited on the site [maybe by g-g-g-ghosts!] so it's being reposted here for posterity's sake. Some numbers may be off by now, but it was all accurate at the time of posting.)
Butterfly Labs has a long and horrible history with their mining rigs. They started taking pre-orders over a year ago, with a ship time sometime in late July. After numerous delays in production, shipping problems and general incompetence, the only thing they’ve managed to get out the door are some of their tiniest miners, the Jalapenos. And those mainly ended up in the hands of reviewers and blogs in order to keep pumping the Butterfly Labs hype train and securing millions of dollars of pre-orders still in limbo.Lucky BFL forums user Luke-JR however scored a sweet Mini Rig from Butterfly Labs (it’s just a coincidence he’s a driver developer for them I’m sure). This rig was originally promised to produce 1500 GH/s hashing power at 1500 watts for $30,000, but has since seen it’s hashing power slashed to a third of what was promised and it’s power consumption increased 75%, now just offer 500 GH/s at 2400 watts. They’ve promised to make good on pre-order buy sending out 3 rigs to match the initial hashing rate, so now it’s only 1500 GH/s at 6900 watts, a reduction in GH/Watt by a factor of 5.
So what does $22,484 buy you? Take a look!
Minirig is here! Today, my Minirig arrived.
http://i.imgur.com/Yp0WPvE.jpg
FedEx apparently dropped it somewhere along the way, and the weakest part of the case, the thin metal part around the back of the PSU, broke.
http://i.imgur.com/lFcOHxP.jpg
I’m not sure how sturdy the back side was supposed to be, but its two pieces aren’t quite together either.
http://i.imgur.com/AVttcOt.jpg
The power supplies (EVGA 1500W) also created havoc interfering with the neutral on the power line. This disrupted X10 communication significantly enough that the pool overflowed because the system controlling it was unable to turn off the pump. Workaround: This PSU supports 240V, so we rewired the outlet. 240V does not use neutral, so now all should be okay.
Edit: 240V workaround is only partial. Still having problems
But the good news is, it all seems to be working for the most part.
Next up, installing it in the window so the heat goes outside
A twenty two thousand dollar box of electronics that is broken out of the box, that required the guy to do a sketchy electrical workaround to get partially working, that he is going to install in a window… and he’s happy about it?
In case you didn’t notice it, the delivered unit is different than the picture on the website. They had to install 2 power supplies instead of 1 and had to modify the case to fit. Also, if you didn’t notice, the LCD/Phone thingy in the front has been replaced by … a piece of cardboard spray painted black. Wonderful.
You could maybe chalk this up to a careless Fedex postman, but when you’re shipping something that costs as much as a mid-sized sedan, how bought putting a little more effort into packing? Dell and HP can ship bigger and heavier servers across the world without this kind of problem.
The unit had to hit its huge power draw increase by putting dual EVGA consumer grade power supplies in the unit. We’re talking almost a 75 amp load (6*1500/120), disregarding power factor. He could very well overload the circuit panel and trip the main breaker for the house.
Let’s take a look inside this guy.
This is from an earlier version of the Minirig (note the single power supply) This is apparently from an earlier FPGA but it will give you a good glimpse at what kind of craftsmanship you can expect from a computer that is half the average household income in the United States.
Consumer grade PSU and cheap USB hubs glued to the inside case.
Electrical tape and random velcro glued to the insides
A closer look at the USB hubs. Plugs are hot glued to stay secured.
Electrical tape everywhere, splices and voided hardware are the theme.
You can view the entire album here.
Despite all that, this thing can still mine bitcoins and it should be profitable. Keep in ind that many people jumped in on the preorders a year ago when bitcoins were still hovering around $6.50 per. Meaning customers paid 1562 bitcoins for that particular piece of shit, which at today’s value is $156,200. Aston martin money. How long will it take them to make their money back (as apposed to just hanging on to them)? If the difficulty didn’t change, they would make 37 bitcoins a day and recoup the initial investment in 124 days. Difficulty is jumping pretty much 20% every 12 days or so, so in the next week before adjustment, they’ll make 259, the next 12 days 369, the next 12 days 312, then 256, then 213, etc.
So by day 127, they’ll be halfway to breaking even, but by day 151 they’ll be making less than 5 bitcoins a day, and even if difficulty stopped rising at that point(which it won’t), it would take another 435 days for a total of 586 days to break even. If difficulty kept rising at the same pace, by day 200 they’d be making 2.4 bitcoins per day, and it would take 1024 days to break even with no difficulty increase. Assuming 25 cents per kw/h, and $100 a bitcoin, it would cost 0.43 of a bitcoin per day in electricity which means the unit would no longer be profitable on a power usage basis by day 307, at which point it will have produced 2620 bitcoins.
Bear in mind this is only for the first few units, and that’s running 24/7 pumping out around 24,000 BTU, so yes, medical bills from heat stroke will be on top of that.
But Alas, the chips don’t run nearly as well as they’re supposed to, frequently running too hot and giving multiple hardware failures. Coindesk noted in one of the first ever runs of the Minirig by hosting provide gigavps that it was running much too hot and erroring out.
At the time of posting, gigavps warned that the unit would be repeatedly shut down while ckolivas, who was assisting, modified the machine’s software to optimise performance. After some tweaking, the device was said to have been left to run continuously for two hours, and was shown to have an average hash rate of 478.1 GH/s. As you can see in the table below, ASIC number four (of a total of eight hashing chips) ran significantly hotter (86 degrees) and consequently gave the highest hardware (HW) error rate.
http://i.imgur.com/q3iGrnb.jpg
So, what happens if you just decide you don’t want this, you don’t want to wait over a year to get a $22,000 broken piece of shit? Nothing, because BFL won’t let you cancel your preorder because they’re now “shipping”, i.e. they sent out one unit to their own company shill.
http://i.imgur.com/0p3Up03.jpg
Which is of course illegal regardless of what Butterfly Labs may say.
So in summary: Don’t buy anything from Butterfly Labs … ever.
submitted by borderpatrol to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profits: Crypto Mining Hardware or Cloud Mining Pools?

Can Cloud Mining Be More Profitable Than Getting Mining Hardware For Bitcoin?
The process of crypto mining demands a lot of preparation, no matter which cryptocurrency you choose. Mining Bitcoin (BTC), however, requires even more.
If you are a Bitcoin miner, or you at least researched the issue, you probably quickly realized that this is quite a difficult process. There a lot of aspects of the process that need to be considered, like the Proof-of-Work’s mining algorithm, fees, and hashing power. Not to mention the extremely expensive equipment that is necessary in order to do it.
However, there is another option which may be more profitable, and that is cloud mining. But is it really the best way to go? Let us find out.
Bitcoin Miningining: Hardware & Cost
Let’s start with the necessary mining hardware. In order to mine Bitcoin, you cannot just use anything, and in order to get a quality device, you will have to prepare quite a sum in advance.
Bitcoin mining hardware can cost from a few thousand dollars to tens of thousands of dollars. The price largely depends on which crypto you wish to mine (in this case, Bitcoin), as well as how big of a mining operation you are planning.
The cost of a mining rig depends on which one you want. You might go for an ASIC mining rig, or a GPU and CPU mining rigs. ASIC mining rig is usually far more expensive, and their hash rates are a lot faster. However, they are known for facing scrutiny due to the fact that you cannot repurpose them.
Basically, if the hash algorithm of the blockchain changes, your ASIC rig will become pretty much useless, and you will have to acquire new gear. Obviously, this is the most expensive solution.
GPU and CPU gear, on the other hand, can be re-purposed. The gear is also a lot cheaper, and much more acceptable than ASIC, which often finds a lot of resistance. This is why most miners choose to go for GPU and CPU instead of ASIC.
Of course, there is always an option to have several mining rigs set up, in order to multiply your earnings. However, this means that you will have to acquire them first, which is probably the most expensive option. Even with several mining rigs working at the same time, it will probably take months before you can cover these initial costs via mining. Not to mention other factors, like the cost of an electric bill that is going to skyrocket as soon as you start your mining operation.
The electricity cost varies depending on your location, which makes it hard to precisely calculate the cost of keeping the operation up and running.
Cryptocurrency Cloud Mining Pools: Profitable or Not?
Calculating the costs of cloud mining, on the other hand, is a much easier process. A lot of companies are using monthly subscriptions, with their cost being determined by the targeted crypto that the user wants to mine. Additionally, the cost of the model is also determined by the hash rate speeds.
For example, taking a contract for 2 years of mining Ethereum with Genesis Mining can cost anywhere between $1,520 and $12,960, depending on the speed which can go from 40 MH/s to 360 MH/s.
On the other hand, there is a website called HashFlare, which can provide you with a contract that lasts only one year, and it costs $1.80 for 100 KH/s.
The fact is that cloud mining is expensive as well, and not that profitable at first. You will probably need more than a year to cover the cost of the initial investment. A lot of people don’t do their research properly, which is why they enter the process expecting to get rich in less than 6 months. This is, of course, never the case.
Generally, cloud mining is not that profitable at all. Because of that, it is also not the popular way of crypto mining. Monthly subscriptions will always be there, but it won’t always be easy to pay them off. There are always the USB mining options but they are not very powerful.
If you choose to go with the mining hardware, the costs will be upfront, and you will know what you are getting into. The cost of electricity will be a bit more difficult to predict, but if you can afford to perform your mining operation in parts of the world where the electricity is cheap, and mining is legal, you can actually make a pretty good profit much faster.
source
submitted by SwitchKanun to hashflareinfo [link] [comments]

USB asic miner problems

hello everyone, i'm kinda new to this bitcoin mining and i have recently managed to get an old and unused usb asic miner which is the avalon nano 3. firstly i have tried to search on the internet on how to setup my miner but it seems that nothing i try is working and at this point i'm really starting to think that this asic miner is a broken unit. no matter what i do i can never seem to get the usb miner to show on any miner software and it is only detected as hid compliant device. can anyone help me
submitted by nonpsyco to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Antminer S9 not hashing?

Good morning folks,
I have an Antminer S9 that has performed flawlessly. After I moved it to a better location, I noticed that it no longer seems to be working. The green light is flashing, but it doesn't seem to be hashing to my pool (Nicehash).
I'm fairly new to Bitcoining mining and can't make sense of some of the information on my status screen. Before I jump into Bitmain support, I was wondering if anyone could clue me in as to what the problem might be.
https://s15.postimg.cc/i0n5qsyoInked_Capture_LI.jpg
I'll post my Kernal Log here.
Thank you in advance!!!
KERNAL LOG: [ 0.000000] Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0
[ 0.000000] Linux version 3.14.0-xilinx-ge8a2f71-dirty (lzq@armdev2) (gcc version 4.8.3 20140320 (prerelease) (Sourcery CodeBench Lite 2014.05-23) ) #82 SMP PREEMPT Tue May 16 19:49:53 CST 2017
[ 0.000000] CPU: ARMv7 Processor [413fc090] revision 0 (ARMv7), cr=18c5387d
[ 0.000000] CPU: PIPT / VIPT nonaliasing data cache, VIPT aliasing instruction cache
[ 0.000000] Machine model: Xilinx Zynq
[ 0.000000] cma: CMA: reserved 128 MiB at 27800000
[ 0.000000] Memory policy: Data cache writealloc
[ 0.000000] On node 0 totalpages: 258048
[ 0.000000] free_area_init_node: node 0, pgdat c0740a40, node_mem_map e6fd8000
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 1520 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 0 pages reserved
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 194560 pages, LIFO batch:31
[ 0.000000] HighMem zone: 496 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] HighMem zone: 63488 pages, LIFO batch:15
[ 0.000000] PERCPU: Embedded 8 pages/cpu @e6fc0000 s9088 r8192 d15488 u32768
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: s9088 r8192 d15488 u32768 alloc=8*4096
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: [0] 0 [0] 1
[ 0.000000] Built 1 zonelists in Zone order, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 256528
[ 0.000000] Kernel command line: noinitrd mem=1008M console=ttyPS0,115200 root=ubi0:rootfs ubi.mtd=1 rootfstype=ubifs rw rootwait
[ 0.000000] PID hash table entries: 4096 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Dentry cache hash table entries: 131072 (order: 7, 524288 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Inode-cache hash table entries: 65536 (order: 6, 262144 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Memory: 884148K/1032192K available (5032K kernel code, 283K rwdata, 1916K rodata, 204K init, 258K bss, 148044K reserved, 253952K highmem)
[ 0.000000] Virtual kernel memory layout:
[ 0.000000] vector : 0xffff0000 - 0xffff1000 ( 4 kB)
[ 0.000000] fixmap : 0xfff00000 - 0xfffe0000 ( 896 kB)
[ 0.000000] vmalloc : 0xf0000000 - 0xff000000 ( 240 MB)
[ 0.000000] lowmem : 0xc0000000 - 0xef800000 ( 760 MB)
[ 0.000000] pkmap : 0xbfe00000 - 0xc0000000 ( 2 MB)
[ 0.000000] modules : 0xbf000000 - 0xbfe00000 ( 14 MB)
[ 0.000000] .text : 0xc0008000 - 0xc06d1374 (6949 kB)
[ 0.000000] .init : 0xc06d2000 - 0xc0705380 ( 205 kB)
[ 0.000000] .data : 0xc0706000 - 0xc074cf78 ( 284 kB)
[ 0.000000] .bss : 0xc074cf84 - 0xc078d9fc ( 259 kB)
[ 0.000000] Preemptible hierarchical RCU implementation.
[ 0.000000] Dump stacks of tasks blocking RCU-preempt GP.
[ 0.000000] RCU restricting CPUs from NR_CPUS=4 to nr_cpu_ids=2.
[ 0.000000] RCU: Adjusting geometry for rcu_fanout_leaf=16, nr_cpu_ids=2
[ 0.000000] NR_IRQS:16 nr_irqs:16 16
[ 0.000000] ps7-slcr mapped to f0004000
[ 0.000000] zynq_clock_init: clkc starts at f0004100
[ 0.000000] Zynq clock init
[ 0.000015] sched_clock: 64 bits at 333MHz, resolution 3ns, wraps every 3298534883328ns
[ 0.000308] ps7-ttc #0 at f0006000, irq=43
[ 0.000618] Console: colour dummy device 80x30
[ 0.000658] Calibrating delay loop... 1325.46 BogoMIPS (lpj=6627328)
[ 0.040207] pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301
[ 0.040436] Mount-cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
[ 0.040459] Mountpoint-cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
[ 0.042612] CPU: Testing write buffer coherency: ok
[ 0.042974] CPU0: thread -1, cpu 0, socket 0, mpidr 80000000
[ 0.043036] Setting up static identity map for 0x4c4b00 - 0x4c4b58
[ 0.043263] L310 cache controller enabled
[ 0.043282] l2x0: 8 ways, CACHE_ID 0x410000c8, AUX_CTRL 0x72760000, Cache size: 512 kB
[ 0.121037] CPU1: Booted secondary processor
[ 0.210227] CPU1: thread -1, cpu 1, socket 0, mpidr 80000001
[ 0.210357] Brought up 2 CPUs
[ 0.210376] SMP: Total of 2 processors activated.
[ 0.210385] CPU: All CPU(s) started in SVC mode.
[ 0.211051] devtmpfs: initialized
[ 0.213481] VFP support v0.3: implementor 41 architecture 3 part 30 variant 9 rev 4
[ 0.214724] regulator-dummy: no parameters
[ 0.223736] NET: Registered protocol family 16
[ 0.226067] DMA: preallocated 256 KiB pool for atomic coherent allocations
[ 0.228361] cpuidle: using governor ladder
[ 0.228374] cpuidle: using governor menu
[ 0.235908] syscon f8000000.ps7-slcr: regmap [mem 0xf8000000-0xf8000fff] registered
[ 0.237440] hw-breakpoint: found 5 (+1 reserved) breakpoint and 1 watchpoint registers.
[ 0.237453] hw-breakpoint: maximum watchpoint size is 4 bytes.
[ 0.237572] zynq-ocm f800c000.ps7-ocmc: ZYNQ OCM pool: 256 KiB @ 0xf0080000
[ 0.259435] bio: create slab at 0
[ 0.261172] vgaarb: loaded
[ 0.261915] SCSI subsystem initialized
[ 0.262814] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs
[ 0.262985] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub
[ 0.263217] usbcore: registered new device driver usb
[ 0.263743] media: Linux media interface: v0.10
[ 0.263902] Linux video capture interface: v2.00
[ 0.264150] pps_core: LinuxPPS API ver. 1 registered
[ 0.264162] pps_core: Software ver. 5.3.6 - Copyright 2005-2007 Rodolfo Giometti <[giometti@linux.it](mailto:giometti@linux.it)>
[ 0.264286] PTP clock support registered
[ 0.264656] EDAC MC: Ver: 3.0.0
[ 0.265719] Advanced Linux Sound Architecture Driver Initialized.
[ 0.268708] DMA-API: preallocated 4096 debug entries
[ 0.268724] DMA-API: debugging enabled by kernel config
[ 0.268820] Switched to clocksource arm_global_timer
[ 0.289596] NET: Registered protocol family 2
[ 0.290280] TCP established hash table entries: 8192 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
[ 0.290375] TCP bind hash table entries: 8192 (order: 4, 65536 bytes)
[ 0.290535] TCP: Hash tables configured (established 8192 bind 8192)
[ 0.290612] TCP: reno registered
[ 0.290633] UDP hash table entries: 512 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.290689] UDP-Lite hash table entries: 512 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
[ 0.290971] NET: Registered protocol family 1
[ 0.291346] RPC: Registered named UNIX socket transport module.
[ 0.291359] RPC: Registered udp transport module.
[ 0.291368] RPC: Registered tcp transport module.
[ 0.291376] RPC: Registered tcp NFSv4.1 backchannel transport module.
[ 0.291391] PCI: CLS 0 bytes, default 64
[ 0.291857] hw perfevents: enabled with ARMv7 Cortex-A9 PMU driver, 7 counters available
[ 0.293945] futex hash table entries: 512 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
[ 0.295408] bounce pool size: 64 pages
[ 0.296323] jffs2: version 2.2. (NAND) © 2001-2006 Red Hat, Inc.
[ 0.296525] msgmni has been set to 1486
[ 0.297330] io scheduler noop registered
[ 0.297343] io scheduler deadline registered
[ 0.297385] io scheduler cfq registered (default)
[ 0.308358] dma-pl330 f8003000.ps7-dma: Loaded driver for PL330 DMAC-2364208
[ 0.308380] dma-pl330 f8003000.ps7-dma: DBUFF-128x8bytes Num_Chans-8 Num_Peri-4 Num_Events-16
[ 0.434378] e0001000.serial: ttyPS0 at MMIO 0xe0001000 (irq = 82, base_baud = 3124999) is a xuartps
[ 1.006815] console [ttyPS0] enabled
[ 1.011106] xdevcfg f8007000.ps7-dev-cfg: ioremap 0xf8007000 to f0068000
[ 1.018731] [drm] Initialized drm 1.1.0 20060810
[ 1.036029] brd: module loaded
[ 1.045494] loop: module loaded
[ 1.055163] e1000e: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Driver - 2.3.2-k
[ 1.060985] e1000e: Copyright(c) 1999 - 2013 Intel Corporation.
[ 1.068779] libphy: XEMACPS mii bus: probed
[ 1.073341] ------------- phy_id = 0x3625e62
[ 1.078112] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: pdev->id -1, baseaddr 0xe000b000, irq 54
[ 1.087072] ehci_hcd: USB 2.0 'Enhanced' Host Controller (EHCI) Driver
[ 1.093912] ehci-pci: EHCI PCI platform driver
[ 1.101155] zynq-dr e0002000.ps7-usb: Unable to init USB phy, missing?
[ 1.107952] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[ 1.114850] mousedev: PS/2 mouse device common for all mice
[ 1.120975] i2c /dev entries driver
[ 1.127946] zynq-edac f8006000.ps7-ddrc: ecc not enabled
[ 1.133474] cpufreq_cpu0: failed to get cpu0 regulator: -19
[ 1.139426] Xilinx Zynq CpuIdle Driver started
[ 1.144261] sdhci: Secure Digital Host Controller Interface driver
[ 1.150384] sdhci: Copyright(c) Pierre Ossman
[ 1.154700] sdhci-pltfm: SDHCI platform and OF driver helper
[ 1.161601] mmc0: no vqmmc regulator found
[ 1.165614] mmc0: no vmmc regulator found
[ 1.208845] mmc0: SDHCI controller on e0100000.ps7-sdio [e0100000.ps7-sdio] using ADMA
[ 1.217539] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbhid
[ 1.223054] usbhid: USB HID core driver
[ 1.227806] nand: device found, Manufacturer ID: 0x2c, Chip ID: 0xda
[ 1.234107] nand: Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP
[ 1.238074] nand: 256MiB, SLC, page size: 2048, OOB size: 64
[ 1.244027] Bad block table found at page 131008, version 0x01
[ 1.250251] Bad block table found at page 130944, version 0x01
[ 1.256303] 3 ofpart partitions found on MTD device pl353-nand
[ 1.262080] Creating 3 MTD partitions on "pl353-nand":
[ 1.267174] 0x000000000000-0x000002000000 : "BOOT.bin-env-dts-kernel"
[ 1.275230] 0x000002000000-0x00000b000000 : "angstram-rootfs"
[ 1.282582] 0x00000b000000-0x000010000000 : "upgrade-rootfs"
[ 1.291630] TCP: cubic registered
[ 1.294869] NET: Registered protocol family 17
[ 1.299597] Registering SWP/SWPB emulation handler
[ 1.305497] regulator-dummy: disabling
[ 1.309875] UBI: attaching mtd1 to ubi0
[ 1.836565] UBI: scanning is finished
[ 1.848221] UBI: attached mtd1 (name "angstram-rootfs", size 144 MiB) to ubi0
[ 1.855302] UBI: PEB size: 131072 bytes (128 KiB), LEB size: 126976 bytes
[ 1.862063] UBI: min./max. I/O unit sizes: 2048/2048, sub-page size 2048
[ 1.868728] UBI: VID header offset: 2048 (aligned 2048), data offset: 4096
[ 1.875605] UBI: good PEBs: 1152, bad PEBs: 0, corrupted PEBs: 0
[ 1.881586] UBI: user volume: 1, internal volumes: 1, max. volumes count: 128
[ 1.888693] UBI: max/mean erase counter: 4/1, WL threshold: 4096, image sequence number: 1134783803
[ 1.897736] UBI: available PEBs: 0, total reserved PEBs: 1152, PEBs reserved for bad PEB handling: 40
[ 1.906953] UBI: background thread "ubi_bgt0d" started, PID 1080
[ 1.906959] drivers/rtc/hctosys.c: unable to open rtc device (rtc0)
[ 1.911038] ALSA device list:
[ 1.911042] No soundcards found.
[ 1.927420] UBIFS: background thread "ubifs_bgt0_0" started, PID 1082
[ 1.956473] UBIFS: recovery needed
[ 2.016970] UBIFS: recovery completed
[ 2.020709] UBIFS: mounted UBI device 0, volume 0, name "rootfs"
[ 2.026635] UBIFS: LEB size: 126976 bytes (124 KiB), min./max. I/O unit sizes: 2048 bytes/2048 bytes
[ 2.035771] UBIFS: FS size: 128626688 bytes (122 MiB, 1013 LEBs), journal size 9023488 bytes (8 MiB, 72 LEBs)
[ 2.045653] UBIFS: reserved for root: 0 bytes (0 KiB)
[ 2.050693] UBIFS: media format: w4/r0 (latest is w4/r0), UUID B079DD56-06BB-4E31-8F5E-A6604F480DB2, small LPT model
[ 2.061987] VFS: Mounted root (ubifs filesystem) on device 0:11.
[ 2.069184] devtmpfs: mounted
[ 2.072297] Freeing unused kernel memory: 204K (c06d2000 - c0705000)
[ 2.920928] random: dd urandom read with 0 bits of entropy available
[ 3.318860]
[ 3.318860] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 3.928853]
[ 3.928853] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 7.929682] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: Set clk to 124999998 Hz
[ 7.935787] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: link up (1000/FULL)
[ 22.563181] In axi fpga driver!
[ 22.566260] request_mem_region OK!
[ 22.569676] AXI fpga dev virtual address is 0xf01fe000
[ 22.574751] *base_vir_addr = 0x8c510
[ 22.590723] In fpga mem driver!
[ 22.593791] request_mem_region OK!
[ 22.597361] fpga mem virtual address is 0xf3000000
[ 23.408156]
[ 23.408156] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 24.038071]
[ 24.038071] bcm54xx_config_init
[ 28.038487] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: Set clk to 124999998 Hz
[ 28.044593] xemacps e000b000.ps7-ethernet: link up (1000/FULL)
This is XILINX board. Totalram: 1039794176
Detect 1GB control board of XILINX
DETECT HW version=0008c510
miner ID : 8118b4c610358854
Miner Type = S9
AsicType = 1387
real AsicNum = 63
use critical mode to search freq...
get PLUG ON=0x000000e0
Find hashboard on Chain[5]
Find hashboard on Chain[6]
Find hashboard on Chain[7]
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[5]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[5] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[5] has core num in PIC
Chain[5] ASIC[15] has core num=5
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[6]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[6] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[6] has core num in PIC
Chain[6] ASIC[17] has core num=8
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[7]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
has freq in PIC, will disable freq setting.
chain[7] has freq in PIC and will jump over...
Chain[7] has core num in PIC
Chain[7] ASIC[8] has core num=13
Chain[7] ASIC[9] has core num=11
Chain[7] ASIC[13] has core num=11
Chain[7] ASIC[19] has core num=14
Chain[7] ASIC[30] has core num=6
Chain[7] ASIC[32] has core num=1
Chain[7] ASIC[42] has core num=2
Chain[7] ASIC[55] has core num=1
Chain[7] ASIC[57] has core num=2
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
get PIC voltage=108 on chain[5], value=880
get PIC voltage=74 on chain[6], value=900
get PIC voltage=108 on chain[7], value=880
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
chain[5] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[5] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[5] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
chain[6] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[6] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[6] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
chain[7] temp offset record: 62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[7] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[7] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
CRC error counter=0
set command mode to VIL
--- check asic number
After Get ASIC NUM CRC error counter=0
set_baud=0
The min freq=700
set real timeout 52, need sleep=379392
After TEST CRC error counter=0
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
search freq for 1 times, completed chain = 3, total chain num = 3
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
restart Miner chance num=2
waiting for receive_func to exit!
waiting for pic heart to exit!
bmminer not found= 1643 root 0:00 grep bmminer
bmminer not found, restart bmminer ...
This is user mode for mining
Detect 1GB control board of XILINX
Miner Type = S9
Miner compile time: Fri Nov 17 17:57:49 CST 2017 type: Antminer S9set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
miner ID : 8118b4c610358854
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
Checking fans!get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
get fan[2] speed=6120
get fan[5] speed=13440
chain[5]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J6] has backup chain_voltage=880
Chain[J6] test patten OK temp=-126
Check chain[5] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[6]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J7] has backup chain_voltage=900
Chain[J7] test patten OK temp=-120
Check chain[6] PIC fw version=0x03
chain[7]: [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255] [63:255]
Chain[J8] has backup chain_voltage=880
Chain[J8] test patten OK temp=-125
Check chain[7] PIC fw version=0x03
Chain[J6] orignal chain_voltage_pic=108 value=880
Chain[J7] orignal chain_voltage_pic=74 value=900
Chain[J8] orignal chain_voltage_pic=108 value=880
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x0000ffff
set_reset_allhashboard = 0x00000000
Chain[J6] has 63 asic
Chain[J7] has 63 asic
Chain[J8] has 63 asic
Chain[J6] has core num in PIC
Chain[J6] ASIC[15] has core num=5
Chain[J7] has core num in PIC
Chain[J7] ASIC[17] has core num=8
Chain[J8] has core num in PIC
Chain[J8] ASIC[8] has core num=13
Chain[J8] ASIC[9] has core num=11
Chain[J8] ASIC[13] has core num=11
Chain[J8] ASIC[19] has core num=14
Chain[J8] ASIC[30] has core num=6
Chain[J8] ASIC[32] has core num=1
Chain[J8] ASIC[42] has core num=2
Chain[J8] ASIC[55] has core num=1
Chain[J8] ASIC[57] has core num=2
miner total rate=13999GH/s fixed rate=13500GH/s
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[5]
Chain:5 chipnum=63
Chain[J6] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:5 temp offset=0
Chain:5 base freq=487
Asic[ 0]:618
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:681 Asic[ 3]:618 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:681 Asic[ 6]:618 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:675
Asic[ 9]:618 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:681 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:606 Asic[15]:487 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:675 Asic[18]:618 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:675 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:687 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:537 Asic[26]:687 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:587 Asic[29]:687 Asic[30]:612 Asic[31]:650 Asic[32]:687
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:650 Asic[35]:687 Asic[36]:631 Asic[37]:662 Asic[38]:693 Asic[39]:631 Asic[40]:662
Asic[41]:662 Asic[42]:543 Asic[43]:668 Asic[44]:693 Asic[45]:568 Asic[46]:675 Asic[47]:700 Asic[48]:631
Asic[49]:568 Asic[50]:700 Asic[51]:631 Asic[52]:625 Asic[53]:700 Asic[54]:631 Asic[55]:675 Asic[56]:662
Asic[57]:631 Asic[58]:662 Asic[59]:687 Asic[60]:631 Asic[61]:681 Asic[62]:700
Chain:5 max freq=700
Chain:5 min freq=487
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[6]
Chain:6 chipnum=63
Chain[J7] voltage added=0.1V
Chain:6 temp offset=0
Chain:6 base freq=687
Asic[ 0]:650
Asic[ 1]:650 Asic[ 2]:650 Asic[ 3]:650 Asic[ 4]:650 Asic[ 5]:650 Asic[ 6]:650 Asic[ 7]:650 Asic[ 8]:650
Asic[ 9]:650 Asic[10]:650 Asic[11]:650 Asic[12]:650 Asic[13]:650 Asic[14]:650 Asic[15]:650 Asic[16]:650
Asic[17]:650 Asic[18]:650 Asic[19]:650 Asic[20]:650 Asic[21]:650 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:650 Asic[24]:650
Asic[25]:650 Asic[26]:656 Asic[27]:656 Asic[28]:656 Asic[29]:656 Asic[30]:656 Asic[31]:656 Asic[32]:656
Asic[33]:656 Asic[34]:656 Asic[35]:656 Asic[36]:656 Asic[37]:656 Asic[38]:656 Asic[39]:656 Asic[40]:656
Asic[41]:656 Asic[42]:656 Asic[43]:656 Asic[44]:656 Asic[45]:656 Asic[46]:656 Asic[47]:656 Asic[48]:656
Asic[49]:656 Asic[50]:656 Asic[51]:656 Asic[52]:656 Asic[53]:656 Asic[54]:656 Asic[55]:656 Asic[56]:656
Asic[57]:656 Asic[58]:656 Asic[59]:656 Asic[60]:656 Asic[61]:656 Asic[62]:656
Chain:6 max freq=656
Chain:6 min freq=650
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[7]
Chain:7 chipnum=63
Chain[J8] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:7 temp offset=0
Chain:7 base freq=637
Asic[ 0]:656
Asic[ 1]:656 Asic[ 2]:656 Asic[ 3]:656 Asic[ 4]:656 Asic[ 5]:656 Asic[ 6]:656 Asic[ 7]:656 Asic[ 8]:637
Asic[ 9]:637 Asic[10]:656 Asic[11]:656 Asic[12]:656 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:656 Asic[15]:662 Asic[16]:662
Asic[17]:662 Asic[18]:662 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:662 Asic[21]:662 Asic[22]:662 Asic[23]:662 Asic[24]:662
Asic[25]:662 Asic[26]:662 Asic[27]:662 Asic[28]:662 Asic[29]:662 Asic[30]:637 Asic[31]:662 Asic[32]:662
Asic[33]:662 Asic[34]:662 Asic[35]:662 Asic[36]:662 Asic[37]:662 Asic[38]:662 Asic[39]:662 Asic[40]:662
Asic[41]:662 Asic[42]:650 Asic[43]:662 Asic[44]:662 Asic[45]:662 Asic[46]:662 Asic[47]:662 Asic[48]:662
Asic[49]:662 Asic[50]:662 Asic[51]:662 Asic[52]:662 Asic[53]:662 Asic[54]:662 Asic[55]:650 Asic[56]:662
Asic[57]:650 Asic[58]:662 Asic[59]:662 Asic[60]:662 Asic[61]:662 Asic[62]:662
Chain:7 max freq=662
Chain:7 min freq=637
Miner fix freq ...
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[5]
Chain:5 chipnum=63
Chain[J6] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:5 temp offset=0
Chain:5 base freq=487
Asic[ 0]:618
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:650 Asic[ 3]:618 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:656 Asic[ 6]:618 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:656
Asic[ 9]:618 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:656 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:606 Asic[15]:487 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:656 Asic[18]:618 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:656 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:650 Asic[23]:656 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:537 Asic[26]:656 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:587 Asic[29]:656 Asic[30]:612 Asic[31]:650 Asic[32]:656
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:650 Asic[35]:656 Asic[36]:631 Asic[37]:656 Asic[38]:656 Asic[39]:631 Asic[40]:656
Asic[41]:656 Asic[42]:543 Asic[43]:656 Asic[44]:656 Asic[45]:568 Asic[46]:656 Asic[47]:656 Asic[48]:631
Asic[49]:568 Asic[50]:656 Asic[51]:631 Asic[52]:625 Asic[53]:656 Asic[54]:631 Asic[55]:656 Asic[56]:656
Asic[57]:631 Asic[58]:656 Asic[59]:656 Asic[60]:631 Asic[61]:656 Asic[62]:656
Chain:5 max freq=656
Chain:5 min freq=487
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[6]
Chain:6 chipnum=63
Chain[J7] voltage added=0.1V
Chain:6 temp offset=0
Chain:6 base freq=687
Asic[ 0]:631
Asic[ 1]:631 Asic[ 2]:631 Asic[ 3]:631 Asic[ 4]:631 Asic[ 5]:631 Asic[ 6]:631 Asic[ 7]:631 Asic[ 8]:631
Asic[ 9]:631 Asic[10]:631 Asic[11]:631 Asic[12]:631 Asic[13]:631 Asic[14]:631 Asic[15]:631 Asic[16]:631
Asic[17]:631 Asic[18]:631 Asic[19]:631 Asic[20]:631 Asic[21]:631 Asic[22]:631 Asic[23]:631 Asic[24]:631
Asic[25]:631 Asic[26]:631 Asic[27]:631 Asic[28]:631 Asic[29]:631 Asic[30]:631 Asic[31]:631 Asic[32]:631
Asic[33]:631 Asic[34]:631 Asic[35]:637 Asic[36]:637 Asic[37]:637 Asic[38]:637 Asic[39]:637 Asic[40]:637
Asic[41]:637 Asic[42]:637 Asic[43]:637 Asic[44]:637 Asic[45]:637 Asic[46]:637 Asic[47]:637 Asic[48]:637
Asic[49]:637 Asic[50]:637 Asic[51]:637 Asic[52]:637 Asic[53]:637 Asic[54]:637 Asic[55]:637 Asic[56]:637
Asic[57]:637 Asic[58]:637 Asic[59]:637 Asic[60]:637 Asic[61]:637 Asic[62]:637
Chain:6 max freq=637
Chain:6 min freq=631
read PIC voltage=940 on chain[7]
Chain:7 chipnum=63
Chain[J8] voltage added=0.2V
Chain:7 temp offset=0
Chain:7 base freq=637
Asic[ 0]:637
Asic[ 1]:637 Asic[ 2]:637 Asic[ 3]:637 Asic[ 4]:637 Asic[ 5]:637 Asic[ 6]:637 Asic[ 7]:637 Asic[ 8]:637
Asic[ 9]:637 Asic[10]:637 Asic[11]:637 Asic[12]:637 Asic[13]:637 Asic[14]:637 Asic[15]:637 Asic[16]:637
Asic[17]:637 Asic[18]:637 Asic[19]:637 Asic[20]:637 Asic[21]:637 Asic[22]:637 Asic[23]:637 Asic[24]:637
Asic[25]:637 Asic[26]:637 Asic[27]:637 Asic[28]:637 Asic[29]:637 Asic[30]:637 Asic[31]:637 Asic[32]:637
Asic[33]:637 Asic[34]:637 Asic[35]:637 Asic[36]:637 Asic[37]:637 Asic[38]:637 Asic[39]:637 Asic[40]:637
Asic[41]:637 Asic[42]:637 Asic[43]:637 Asic[44]:637 Asic[45]:637 Asic[46]:637 Asic[47]:637 Asic[48]:637
Asic[49]:643 Asic[50]:643 Asic[51]:643 Asic[52]:643 Asic[53]:643 Asic[54]:643 Asic[55]:643 Asic[56]:643
Asic[57]:643 Asic[58]:643 Asic[59]:643 Asic[60]:643 Asic[61]:643 Asic[62]:643
Chain:7 max freq=643
Chain:7 min freq=637
max freq = 656
set baud=1
Chain[J6] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[5] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[5] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J6] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[5] chip[244] local:26 remote:27 offset:29
Chain[J6] chip[244] get middle temp offset=29 typeID=55
Chain[J7] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[6] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[6] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J7] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[6] chip[244] local:26 remote:27 offset:29
Chain[J7] chip[244] get middle temp offset=29 typeID=55
Chain[J8] PIC temp offset=62,0,0,0,0,0,35,28
chain[7] temp chip I2C addr=0x98
chain[7] has no middle temp, use special fix mode.
Chain[J8] chip[244] use PIC middle temp offset=0 typeID=55
New offset Chain[7] chip[244] local:26 remote:28 offset:28
Chain[J8] chip[244] get middle temp offset=28 typeID=55
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[5]
get PIC voltage=880 on chain[5], check: must be < 900
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[6]
get PIC voltage=900 on chain[6], check: must be < 900
miner rate=13501 voltage limit=900 on chain[7]
get PIC voltage=880 on chain[7], check: must be < 900
Chain[J6] set working voltage=880 [108]
Chain[J7] set working voltage=900 [74]
Chain[J8] set working voltage=880 [108]
do heat board 8xPatten for 1 times
start send works on chain[5]
start send works on chain[6]
start send works on chain[7]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[5]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[6]
get send work num :57456 on Chain[7]
wait recv nonce on chain[5]
wait recv nonce on chain[6]
wait recv nonce on chain[7]
get nonces on chain[5]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=912 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=912 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=912
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
freq[00]=618 freq[01]=631 freq[02]=650 freq[03]=618 freq[04]=631 freq[05]=656 freq[06]=618 freq[07]=631
freq[08]=656 freq[09]=618 freq[10]=631 freq[11]=656 freq[12]=631 freq[13]=637 freq[14]=606 freq[15]=487
freq[16]=637 freq[17]=656 freq[18]=618 freq[19]=637 freq[20]=656 freq[21]=631 freq[22]=650 freq[23]=656
freq[24]=631 freq[25]=537 freq[26]=656 freq[27]=631 freq[28]=587 freq[29]=656 freq[30]=612 freq[31]=650
freq[32]=656 freq[33]=631 freq[34]=650 freq[35]=656 freq[36]=631 freq[37]=656 freq[38]=656 freq[39]=631
freq[40]=656 freq[41]=656 freq[42]=543 freq[43]=656 freq[44]=656 freq[45]=568 freq[46]=656 freq[47]=656
freq[48]=631 freq[49]=568 freq[50]=656 freq[51]=631 freq[52]=625 freq[53]=656 freq[54]=631 freq[55]=656
freq[56]=656 freq[57]=631 freq[58]=656 freq[59]=656 freq[60]=631 freq[61]=656 freq[62]=656
total valid nonce number:57456
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:25912
last_nonce_num:14370
get nonces on chain[6]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=912 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=912 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=912
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
freq[00]=631 freq[01]=631 freq[02]=631 freq[03]=631 freq[04]=631 freq[05]=631 freq[06]=631 freq[07]=631
freq[08]=631 freq[09]=631 freq[10]=631 freq[11]=631 freq[12]=631 freq[13]=631 freq[14]=631 freq[15]=631
freq[16]=631 freq[17]=631 freq[18]=631 freq[19]=631 freq[20]=631 freq[21]=631 freq[22]=631 freq[23]=631
freq[24]=631 freq[25]=631 freq[26]=631 freq[27]=631 freq[28]=631 freq[29]=631 freq[30]=631 freq[31]=631
freq[32]=631 freq[33]=631 freq[34]=631 freq[35]=637 freq[36]=637 freq[37]=637 freq[38]=637 freq[39]=637
freq[40]=637 freq[41]=637 freq[42]=637 freq[43]=637 freq[44]=637 freq[45]=637 freq[46]=637 freq[47]=637
freq[48]=637 freq[49]=637 freq[50]=637 freq[51]=637 freq[52]=637 freq[53]=637 freq[54]=637 freq[55]=637
freq[56]=637 freq[57]=637 freq[58]=637 freq[59]=637 freq[60]=637 freq[61]=637 freq[62]=637
total valid nonce number:57456
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:25987
last_nonce_num:14368
get nonces on chain[7]
require nonce number:912
require validnonce number:57456
asic[00]=912 asic[01]=912 asic[02]=912 asic[03]=912 asic[04]=912 asic[05]=912 asic[06]=912 asic[07]=912
asic[08]=907 asic[09]=912 asic[10]=912 asic[11]=912 asic[12]=912 asic[13]=912 asic[14]=912 asic[15]=912
asic[16]=912 asic[17]=912 asic[18]=912 asic[19]=909 asic[20]=912 asic[21]=912 asic[22]=912 asic[23]=912
asic[24]=912 asic[25]=912 asic[26]=912 asic[27]=912 asic[28]=912 asic[29]=912 asic[30]=912 asic[31]=912
asic[32]=912 asic[33]=912 asic[34]=912 asic[35]=912 asic[36]=912 asic[37]=912 asic[38]=912 asic[39]=912
asic[40]=912 asic[41]=912 asic[42]=912 asic[43]=912 asic[44]=912 asic[45]=912 asic[46]=912 asic[47]=912
asic[48]=912 asic[49]=912 asic[50]=912 asic[51]=912 asic[52]=912 asic[53]=912 asic[54]=912 asic[55]=911
asic[56]=912 asic[57]=912 asic[58]=912 asic[59]=912 asic[60]=912 asic[61]=912 asic[62]=912
Below ASIC's core didn't receive all the nonce, they should receive 8 nonce each!
asic[08]=907
core[049]=7 core[053]=5 core[056]=7
asic[19]=909
core[064]=7 core[112]=6
asic[55]=911
core[007]=7
freq[00]=637 freq[01]=637 freq[02]=637 freq[03]=637 freq[04]=637 freq[05]=637 freq[06]=637 freq[07]=637
freq[08]=637 freq[09]=637 freq[10]=637 freq[11]=637 freq[12]=637 freq[13]=637 freq[14]=637 freq[15]=637
freq[16]=637 freq[17]=637 freq[18]=637 freq[19]=637 freq[20]=637 freq[21]=637 freq[22]=637 freq[23]=637
freq[24]=637 freq[25]=637 freq[26]=637 freq[27]=637 freq[28]=637 freq[29]=637 freq[30]=637 freq[31]=637
freq[32]=637 freq[33]=637 freq[34]=637 freq[35]=637 freq[36]=637 freq[37]=637 freq[38]=637 freq[39]=637
freq[40]=637 freq[41]=637 freq[42]=637 freq[43]=637 freq[44]=637 freq[45]=637 freq[46]=637 freq[47]=637
freq[48]=637 freq[49]=643 freq[50]=643 freq[51]=643 freq[52]=643 freq[53]=643 freq[54]=643 freq[55]=643
freq[56]=643 freq[57]=643 freq[58]=643 freq[59]=643 freq[60]=643 freq[61]=643 freq[62]=643
total valid nonce number:57447
total send work number:57456
require valid nonce number:57456
repeated_nonce_num:0
err_nonce_num:26183
last_nonce_num:35748
chain[5]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[5]: OK!
chain[6]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[6]: OK!
chain[7]: All chip cores are opened OK!
Test Patten on chain[7]: OK!
setStartTimePoint total_tv_start_sys=217 total_tv_end_sys=218
restartNum = 2 , auto-reinit enabled...
do read_temp_func once...
do check_asic_reg 0x08
get RT hashrate from Chain[5]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=72.5110 Asic[02]=68.6020 Asic[03]=74.4230 Asic[04]=74.6750 Asic[05]=71.4540 Asic[06]=77.5610 Asic[07]=74.7760 Asic[08]=74.3900
Asic[09]=77.7790 Asic[10]=76.7220 Asic[11]=73.8020 Asic[12]=68.5850 Asic[13]=76.1680 Asic[14]=72.4770 Asic[15]=73.0470 Asic[16]=57.8810
Asic[17]=74.4740 Asic[18]=76.4530 Asic[19]=67.8800 Asic[20]=70.1280 Asic[21]=73.7520 Asic[22]=74.6580 Asic[23]=73.6850 Asic[24]=78.5170
Asic[25]=73.6850 Asic[26]=63.6860 Asic[27]=80.9660 Asic[28]=73.9200 Asic[29]=68.9870 Asic[30]=75.6310 Asic[31]=74.9770 Asic[32]=69.4570
Asic[33]=74.6580 Asic[34]=79.8930 Asic[35]=76.6710 Asic[36]=74.3730 Asic[37]=66.6050 Asic[38]=76.7380 Asic[39]=71.4540 Asic[40]=69.3060
Asic[41]=72.5610 Asic[42]=73.8530 Asic[43]=58.9210 Asic[44]=75.3800 Asic[45]=73.1310 Asic[46]=68.4000 Asic[47]=77.6780 Asic[48]=73.1150
Asic[49]=69.2890 Asic[50]=62.8130 Asic[51]=74.2720 Asic[52]=73.1480 Asic[53]=67.4440 Asic[54]=72.4940 Asic[55]=68.1990 Asic[56]=72.4100
Asic[57]=75.3460 Asic[58]=66.1350 Asic[59]=72.9800 Asic[60]=78.1480 Asic[61]=72.3260 Asic[62]=72.5610 Asic[63]=77.7950
get RT hashrate from Chain[6]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=67.6620 Asic[02]=75.9840 Asic[03]=70.3300 Asic[04]=75.5640 Asic[05]=62.8470 Asic[06]=70.2790 Asic[07]=74.5240 Asic[08]=72.9130
Asic[09]=70.6320 Asic[10]=72.5610 Asic[11]=73.9370 Asic[12]=77.3420 Asic[13]=72.4440 Asic[14]=68.8030 Asic[15]=73.0810 Asic[16]=73.8360
Asic[17]=73.5510 Asic[18]=73.9700 Asic[19]=71.0340 Asic[20]=71.1680 Asic[21]=72.1580 Asic[22]=78.8190 Asic[23]=71.9230 Asic[24]=69.4570
Asic[25]=67.7630 Asic[26]=71.7220 Asic[27]=76.4030 Asic[28]=71.1180 Asic[29]=68.7360 Asic[30]=69.7090 Asic[31]=77.5610 Asic[32]=70.1790
Asic[33]=67.9140 Asic[34]=72.3930 Asic[35]=64.5920 Asic[36]=72.1920 Asic[37]=74.6080 Asic[38]=75.4470 Asic[39]=73.8700 Asic[40]=73.9370
Asic[41]=66.2860 Asic[42]=79.4230 Asic[43]=75.8160 Asic[44]=68.6350 Asic[45]=74.7920 Asic[46]=70.7990 Asic[47]=71.2360 Asic[48]=73.8700
Asic[49]=66.5380 Asic[50]=70.6150 Asic[51]=72.6280 Asic[52]=75.7490 Asic[53]=71.8400 Asic[54]=76.5370 Asic[55]=73.5340 Asic[56]=69.2390
Asic[57]=75.1280 Asic[58]=74.3230 Asic[59]=73.4330 Asic[60]=72.3430 Asic[61]=77.6780 Asic[62]=82.4600 Asic[63]=69.5240
get RT hashrate from Chain[7]: (asic index start from 1-63)
Asic[01]=73.5510 Asic[02]=75.9160 Asic[03]=80.1110 Asic[04]=76.9900 Asic[05]=76.1510 Asic[06]=73.5170 Asic[07]=74.9940 Asic[08]=73.1150
Asic[09]=70.6650 Asic[10]=70.6990 Asic[11]=72.4770 Asic[12]=70.1450 Asic[13]=74.3060 Asic[14]=71.8060 Asic[15]=74.7420 Asic[16]=75.6650
Asic[17]=76.8220 Asic[18]=69.5240 Asic[19]=72.0910 Asic[20]=75.2620 Asic[21]=72.0240 Asic[22]=73.2660 Asic[23]=76.2690 Asic[24]=69.9440
Asic[25]=67.7290 Asic[26]=71.7050 Asic[27]=74.6250 Asic[28]=78.2320 Asic[29]=69.8430 Asic[30]=68.4670 Asic[31]=71.5210 Asic[32]=68.9540
Asic[33]=74.6250 Asic[34]=71.8730 Asic[35]=74.4400 Asic[36]=74.8760 Asic[37]=73.9030 Asic[38]=72.9300 Asic[39]=69.6250 Asic[40]=74.9430
Asic[41]=72.7620 Asic[42]=69.4910 Asic[43]=67.4270 Asic[44]=71.4870 Asic[45]=74.4570 Asic[46]=66.6550 Asic[47]=67.5450 Asic[48]=75.4800
Asic[49]=72.2590 Asic[50]=72.9300 Asic[51]=75.6820 Asic[52]=71.9070 Asic[53]=67.9640 Asic[54]=67.8470 Asic[55]=74.3900 Asic[56]=71.0010
Asic[57]=75.8490 Asic[58]=74.9270 Asic[59]=72.3930 Asic[60]=74.3730 Asic[61]=75.5310 Asic[62]=73.8190 Asic[63]=72.4440
Check Chain[J6] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Check Chain[J7] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Check Chain[J8] ASIC RT error: (asic index start from 1-63)
Done check_asic_reg
do read temp on Chain[5]
Chain[5] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=29
Chain[5] Chip[62] local Temp=60
Chain[5] Chip[62] middle Temp=70
Special fix Chain[5] Chip[62] middle Temp = 75
Done read temp on Chain[5]
do read temp on Chain[6]
Chain[6] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=29
Chain[6] Chip[62] local Temp=60
Chain[6] Chip[62] middle Temp=72
Special fix Chain[6] Chip[62] middle Temp = 75
Done read temp on Chain[6]
do read temp on Chain[7]
Chain[7] Chip[62] TempTypeID=55 middle offset=28
Chain[7] Chip[62] local Temp=62
Chain[7] Chip[62] middle Temp=72
Special fix Chain[7] Chip[62] middle Temp = 77
Done read temp on Chain[7]
set FAN speed according to: temp_highest=62 temp_top1[PWM_T]=62 temp_top1[TEMP_POS_LOCAL]=62 temp_change=0 fix_fan_steps=0
FAN PWM: 74
read_temp_func Done!
CRC error counter=0
submitted by Timsierramist to BITMAIN [link] [comments]

Mining Hardware ASICMINER USB Block Erupter - Bitcoin ASIC Miner NICEHASH - VIDEO 1 - ASIC USB CHIAVETTA - YouTube Are USB Bitcoin Miners Profitable RIGHT NOW In 2020? - YouTube Bitcoin Avalon ASIC. Bitcoin Miner ASIC Block Erupter (336 mh/s!)

In this article, we look at some of the top USB ASIC miner devices on the market as well as explain the advantages and disadvantages of using a USB ASIC miner versus traditional mining hardware. Finally, we try to assess whether or not the profits justify the costs of buying one of these devices. In addition to a Bitcoin mining ASIC, you’ll need some other Bitcoin mining equipment: ... There is USB Bitcoin mining hardware, which mines bitcoins. ... process used in the manufacture of the S9 is a major improvement upon the 28 nm design common to other modern mining devices. Although a 10nm process is on the horizon for 2017, further ... Relation to the ASIC bitcoin miner USB, it generates a power of 25 gigahash/second which is, nowadays; almost nothing but not that much due to the rise in difficulty of obtaining the Bitcoins. The device will need active cooling as it gets hot due to the processing i.e 80 degrees on the heatsink. Bitcoin Mining Hardware Guide The best Bitcoin mining hardware has evolved dramatically since 2009. At first, miners used their central processing unit (CPU) to mine, but soon this wasn't fast enough and it bogged down the system resources of the host computer. Miners quickly moved on to using the graphical processing unit (GPU) in computer graphics cards because they were able to hash data 50 ... ASICminer - Bitfountain USB ASIC Bitcoin Miner 336 MH/s 3.9 out of 5 stars 8 FutureBit Apollo LTC Pod ASIC Miner and Full Litecoin Node for Scrypt Algorithm Cryptocurrencies Litecoin - Batch 3 - Full Node Package - SD Card, 64 GB USB Node Drive, and 200W PSU Ready to Run!

[index] [4984] [766] [667] [1116] [2037] [2443] [469] [4267] [1357] [4954]

Mining Hardware ASICMINER USB Block Erupter - Bitcoin ASIC Miner

BITCOIN Mining in 2019 - ASIC USB Miner - Does it make Sense ? - Duration: 11:28. TechMagnet 171,546 views. 11:28. GUADAGNO CON IL WALLET ELECTRUM VIDEO 1 - Duration: 5:02. Are USB Bitcoin Miners profitable right now? This video will show you all of the facts you need to know about usb bitcoin miners and how much money they actu... SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE HOW MUCH - http://shorturl.at/arBHL GekkoScience NewPac USB Miner - https://bit.ly/2RIQgdX GekkoScience 8 Port USB Hub - https://bit.ly/2x... Device Specs: 2.5 watts power usage per miner (500-510mA powered via USB) 333 MH/s ... How to setup USB Asic Miner Red Fury bitcoin miner 2.2~2.7 GH/s with cgminer - Duration: 5:53. Instruction book: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81lOfu4a6VL.pdf Driver usb: https://zadig.akeo.ie/ Forum Gekko Newpac: https://bitcointalk...

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